-CHAPTER 20-

The History of the Dalton's Medieval Wives' Families

 

Researched, complied and edited by Rodney G. Dalton

 

Chapter 16  Chapter 17  Chapter 18  Chapter 19  Chapter 20   Back to The Dalton Chronicles

This history of the Dalton's medieval wives' families is put together to read all about the families who married into our Dalton family.

Contents:

Families in chronological order are:

1. Lawence

2. de Latham

3. Hussey

4. Pilkington

5. Holker

6. Fleming

7. Towneley

The furthest back in time that we have found information about our Dalton's medieval wives is the name of Lawrence. A Miss Lawrence married Sir Richard Dalton II in 1277 in Lancaster, Lancashire England.

 

Generation No. 1

1. Sir Robert De Lancaster was born Abt. 1150 in Lancashire, England, and died Abt. 1190 in Ashton Hall, Lancashire, England.

Notes for Sir Robert De Lancaster as copied from various sources on the Internet:

The Lawrence Family came from Normandy in France, but settled in England after the Norman invasion, carrying with them their Norman traditions and customs that clearly showed up, especially in architectures.

Robert Lawrence was the first to carry the standard over the walls of Acre. This Lawrence, born in 1150, built the beautiful and interesting stronghold Ashton Hall in 1191. Ashton Hall, in its setting of gigantic firs, is one of the most artistic of the really old castles. Mellowed by wind and weather, it runs the whole gamut of warm colors from tender pinks and yellows to deep red browns and cold green grays. The soft gray lichens and deep green mosses add variety to the grimness of the old stone.

Doomsday Book calls Ashton "Estun", which means the Ash Village. The quantities of ash trees indicate fertile soil.

The old builders had no consideration for the draftsman, but seemed to use whatever was at hand regardless of design, as in the ramparts of the Norman Towers in the oldest part of Ashton Hall. One block of stone seems to be two or three feet in width and the one next to it appears only a few inches wide. The parapets may have been constructed in this irregular pattern as a means of defense.

About 200 years after Ashton Hall was built with its square towers set at right angles to the corners (to the discomfort of two daring draftsmen), the more feudal aspect of the castle was changed. The moat was filled in, a large entrance built and a high wall which still encloses the Green Court. The wide arch with Tuscan columns on either side, with an entablature, and a groined stone ceiling with good carvings are interesting features of the gateway.

The name Lawrence is derived from Laurus, which means "flourishing as a bay tree." Bay trees live hundreds of years, renewing themselves from the roots. The specimen at the entrance of Ashton Hall must be centuries old and was undoubtedly planted by one of the Lawrences. The house was enlarged and beautified in the 18th century by Elizabeth Bromley, daughter of Sir John Lawrence, who had married the Duke of Hamilton. For 650 years Ashton Hall was the residence of the direct descendants of Sir Robert, but in 1850 it was sold out of the family.

Some of the interesting Lawrences who lived in Ashton Hall were Robert, son of Sir Robert, the builder of the home, and his son James, who married Matilda de Washington in 1252. Sir Henry and Lord Lawrence distinguished themselves by outstanding service in India. Nicholas Lawrence lived in Agercraft, England. One of his younger sons, Henry, settled in Greton, Massachusetts and started the Lawrence Cotton and Wool Mills. In 1792 Henry's sons, Amos and William Lawrence, founded the Groton Academy in Groton MA, which today is known as Lawrence Academy. Abbot Lawrence, one of the sons, lived at Court of St. James at Cadegan House, Piccadilly from 1849-1852.

Sir Robert Lawrence was born in about the year 1150 A.D. in the direct vicinity of Lancaster, Lancashire, England. His father, also named Robert, was a silversmith and worked for the resident Lord of Lancaster Castle. Lan caster Castle, built on the remains of three Roman forts, was first established in about the year 1100 A.D. Today it serves as a prison for Britain. While attending his sovereign, Richard Coeur de Lion, to the war of t he Crusades in the Holy Land, he so distinguished himself in the siege of Acre, that he was knighted 'Sir Robert of Ashton Hall,' and obtained for his arms, 'Argent, a cross raguly gules,' A.D. 1191.

Sir Robert Lawrence also is referred to Robert de Lancaster in some texts. This probably is more accurate as surnames did not come into common use until the late 1200s or early 1300s.

Robert Lawrence joined the Third Crusades in 1187 A.D. led by Richard Coeur de Lion. He traveled by ship first to Cyprus and then to what is now present day Palestine. There he took part in the siege of Acre. One version indicates that he scaled the walls of Acre with four other men and open ed the gates to the armies of the Crusades. Another version indicates that he was the first to raise the flag of the Crusades on a Palestine hill during the siege of Acre. For his deeds he was knighted by King Richard in 1191 A.D. and was given Ashton Hall. Another writer indicates that he was created a Knight-Banneret (a military Knighthood and the highest grade in the Middle Ages) and was allow to bear for Arms, "Agent, a cross ragulée gules," a red cross of trunks of trees having pieces like couped boughs projecting from the side in a slanting direction, on a silver shield. This Arms is registered with the College of Arms in London, England.

Ashton Hall, the ancient seat of the Lawrences, is located about three miles to the south of the town of Lancaster, in northern Lancashire. It is picturesquely situated, commanding fine views of the estuary of the River Lune, and of Morecambe Bay, an extensive inlet of the Irish Sea. Ashton Hall is noted for the sylvan beauty of its spacious park, which is well diversified with hill and vale. The mansion is a large edifice, with many of the characteristics of an ancient baronial castle, having a square tower at one end, and numerous battlements, turrets, and machiocolations. Successive alterations and additions have been made at different epochs, in harmony with the medieval type of architecture. The oldest portion is probably from the fourteenth century. The interior contains a fine baronial hall.

According to the Imperial Gazetteer of England, Ashton Hall is the seat in the township of Ashton-with-Stoddy, Lancashire, between the Preston and Lancaster railway and the estuary of the Lune, about 2 and 3/4 miles south of Lancaster. Ownership of Ashton Hall eventually passed by marriage to the Dukes of Hamilton.

One source indicates that within the halls of Ashton Manor is a silver cup adorned with the motif of Roman armies and the Roman General, Julius Agricola who was born in the year 40 A.D. Legend indicates that General Agricola arrived in Lancaster in the year 89 A.D. where he and his armies built the first wooden fort upon a hill where Lancaster Castle stands. During his stay, he met and fell in love with a young British girl by whom he had a son. He was unable to take the girl and child with him when he returned to Italy where he had a large estate, wife, and children. He gave the cup to the girl as a legacy. The son supposedly became the first silversmith in a long line of silversmiths and, according to legend, was the direct ancestor of the above Robert Lawrence.

Robert Lawrence joined the Third Crusades in 1187 A.D. He traveled by ship to Cyprus with Richard the Lion-Hearted, and then to what is now Palestine. There he took part in the bloody siege of Acre. One source indicates that he was the first to raise the Christian flag on a hill outside the city. Another version indicates that he scaled the walls of Acre with four other men and opened the gates to the armies of the Crusades. If he did, he was no doubt also involved in the wholesale massacre of every male inhabitant which followed.

At any rate, Robert was knighted on the battlefield for his deeds by King Richard in 1191 A.D., and given Ashton Hall.

He was created a Knight-Banneret (a military Knighthood and the highest grade in the Middle Ages) and was allow to bear for Arms, "Agent, a cross ragulée gules," a red cross of trunks of trees having pieces like couped boughs projecting from the side in a slanting direction, on a silver shield. This Arms is registered with the College of Arms in London, England.

Sir Robert Lawrence is also referred to as Robert de Lancaster in some texts. This probably is more accurate, as surnames did not come into common use until the late 1200s. The first to actually use the Lawrence surname was John, the first Squire of Ashton Hall, deriving it from the given name of his father Lawrence de Lancaster.

Edmund Lawrence, the second Squire of Ashton, was born around 1315. In 1338 he held, with his parents, the Stapleton part of the manor of Ashton for life. But he wanted much more, and devoted his life to acquiring it.

He married twice for money. First he married Alice de Cuerdale, the daughter of John de Cuerdale and Dionisia. But he terminated the marriage without issue, and poor Alice died by 1353. His second wife, Agnes, daughter and heiress of Robert de Washington, Lord of the manor of Scotforth, brought him other lands and also, notably, the income of the manors of Carnforth and Carleton.

In 1345, Edmund was appointed commissioner with his uncle William "to investigate wastes" in the manor of Wyresdale. In 1348, John Franceys dismissed a considerable part of these lands to Edmund for life, at the rent of a rose for six years and 100 shillings thereafter. By 1357 he had a feoffment of lands in Lancaster, Skerton, Ellel, Ashton, and Preeshall. Then, in 1358, he ran afoul of the law for acquiring a life interest in the Irish Manors of Baliogary, Lough and Casterling without obtaining a license from the crown. He was pardoned after paying out 100 shillings in fines.

Soon thereafter, Edmund was in trouble again. He was charged with making off with 200 pounds in silver from John Darcy's house in Preeshall. But he was pardoned again, this time for his military service in France. He was Knight of the Shire in 1362 when he and Matthew de Rixton, being deputies of the sheriff, concealed the election writ and returned themselves as knights of the shire again. This return was later quashed, but not before he became receiver of Queen Philippa's tax monies in Ireland in 1363.

Somehow, Edmund continued to acquire positions of trust. In 1367 he was attorney in England for the Prior of St. Mary's, Lancaster. And in 1368 he was made commissioner of Array to choose 100 archers in Lancashire.

In 1373 he held for life three plough-lands of Thomas de Stapleton by a rent of 20 marks. He did release his life interest in the Irish Manors and in that of Dunmow in 1375. But shortly before his death, John de Oxcliffe granted him yet another estate in Overton. Edmund died a wealthy man in 1381 at 66 years of age. In addition to the rest, Edmund held lands in Skerton and Heysham. ten burgages, two messuages, and 30 acres of land "by a rent of 6s. 8d. of the duke in free burgage" at the time of his death.

Sir Robert Lawrence 3rd

Sir Robert Lawrence was born in England in 1371. He was the third Squire of Ashton and married Margaret Holden. He not only inherited his father's lands and manors, but added to those estates in Ireland and the manors of Southworth and Dillicar in County Westmoreland.

     

In 1402 he was appointed a commissioner to arrest "sedition mongers". In 1403 he assembled knights and yeomen in Lancashire and brought them to the king to fight against the Earl of Northumbland in Scotland. He was appointed Knight of the Shire in 1403, 1406, and 1414.

A considerable contingent from Lancaster accompanied Henry V to France in 1415. John Lord Harcourt, bannert, took two knights, twenty-seven men-at-arms, and ninety archers; seven knights and two esquires, John Stanley and "Robert Laurence" each served with fifty archers. The campaign ended with the famous victory at Agincourt, and Robert was knighted in 1417 for his service.

In 1419 he was en charged to raise a loan for the King and in 1421 commissioned to bring 400 more archers to France as the Hundred Years' War ground on. Robert died 8 September 1439 in England, at 68 years of age.

The Last Lawrence Squire of Ashton, [Sir] Thomas Lawrence was born between 1461 and 1470. The Victoria History of the county of Lancaster indicates that he was 24 in 1490 (b. 1464) at the death of his father, Sir James. Thomas died about 1504, and his estates were transferred to his brother John. Apparently, Sir Thomas' eldest son John had been outlawed to France for killing an Usher of Henry VII, and his second son Thomas wished to remain a Monk. But brother John died before he could assume control of the estate. The direct line of Ashton Lawrence’s came to an end and the estates passed to his aunts.

     

14th century Ashton Hall, Lancashire

Child of Sir Robert De Lancaster is:

i.    Robert of Lawrence, born Abt. 1180 in Ashton Hall, Lancashire Co., England.

 

Generation No. 2

2. Robert of Lawrence was born Abt. 1180 in Ashton Hall, Lancashire Co., England, and died in . He married Miss Trafford.

Child of Robert Lawrence and Miss Trafford is:

i.    James Lawrence, born Abt. 1220 in Ashton Hall, Lancashire Co., England

 

Generation No. 3

3. James Lawrence was born Abt. 1220 in Ashton Hall, Lancashire Co., England, and died in . He married Matilda De Washington 1252. She was born Abt. 1233.

Children of James Lawrence and Matilda De Washington are:

i.    John Lawrence, born Abt. 1248.

ii.   Miss Lawrence, born Abt. 1253 in Ashton Hall, Lancashire, England.

 

Generation No. 4

4. Miss Lawrence was born Abt. 1253 in Ashton Hall, Lancashire, England. She married Sir Richard Dalton II 1277 in Lancaster, Lancashire England, son of Sir 1st. and Unknown. He was born Abt. 1230 in Byspham, Lancashire, England, and died Abt. 1293 in Bysham, Lancashire, England.

Lawrence is derived from the Latin Laurus or Laurentius. It has been given various meanings among which is "flourishing like a bay tree" and "crow ned with laurel," both implying that the owner of the name was successful. Variations of the name are Laurence and Lawrance with the spelling Lawrence being the most prevalent in modern times. In old English records Lawrence also is found spelled Laurens or Laurenz, the French spelling, indicating that the family origins may have been from the Normans who invaded and conquered England in the Eleventh Century. In colonial records, all three spellings are found as well as other variations such as Larrance depending on the individual doing the recording. It is not unusual to find various spellings referring to the same individual.

The earliest bearer of the name is Laurentius, the chief deacon of Pope Sixtus II, Bishop of Rome in 258 A.D. Laurentius also in known as St. Lawrence, the Martyr. He was overwhelmed with grief when Pope Sixus was condemned to death. Overjoyed when Sixus predicted that he would follow him in three days, he sold many of the Church's possessions and donated the money to the poor. When the prefect of Rome heard of his action, he had Lawrence brought before him and demanded all of the Church's treasures. Lawrence indicated that he would need three days to collect them and then presented the blind, the crippled, the poor, the orphans, and other unfortunates to the prefect and told him that they were the Church's treasures. This infuriated the prefect, and he had Lawrence bound to a red-hot griddle. Lawrence bore the agony with unbelievable equanimity and in the mid st of his torment instructed the executioner to turn him over, as he was broiled enough on one side. According to Prudentius, his death and example led to the conversion of Rome and signaled the end of paganism in the city.

Notes for Sir Richard Dalton II:
The below research is where our Dalton family starts with the mention of Sir Rychard Dalton of Byspham in Lancashire. Anything before that is speculation and future research is needed;

The Flower's Visitation of Yorkshire in 1563-4 gave the main pedigree of t he Dalton family. It started with Sir Rychard of Byspham born about 1230 a nd holding the manors of Byspham in Lancashire and Kirkby Misperton in Yorkshire. He had two sons, Sir Robert and Sir John. Sir John held the man or of Kirkby in 1332 and may have founded the Yorkshire line of Daltons. Sir Robert was born in 1284 and died in 1350. About 1320, he married Mary, the daughter of Sir Thomas Lathom and she bore him a son, Sir John Dalton. Sir Robert had sided with the Earl of Lancaster who was beheaded in 1322 and Sir Robert was confined to Pontifract Castle for a time. However, his friends raised a ransom for him, so he was released and allowed to go back to his home at Byspham Manor. In 1327, when Edward II came to the throne, the fine was returned to Sir Robert and he was made Keeper of the Royal Forests and then the Constable of the Tower of London.

In the spring of 1346, King Edward prepared to invade France. He assembled the greatest army seen in England up to that date. With the King were his son, Richard the Black Prince, 12 Earls, over 1000 Knights, 4000 esquires, 20,000 archers and an unnumbered host of yeomen, blacksmiths, messengers, masons, cooks, minstrels and other camp followers.

So we can imagine Sir Robert riding from his home in Byspham, clad in his best armour, wearing his plumed helm and carrying his great broad sword, his lance and with his shield in azure blue with the silver lion on his chest. He would be riding his great war horse which would be clad in armour. By his side was his son, Sir John, also in his best armour and behind them an esquire carrying a banner with the full coat of arms embroidered on it, complete with the green Griffen. They were also accompanied by a priest who bore a portable altar and some new winding sheets, just in case things did not go too well. Winding sheets were burial sheets or palls. The party rode down through Lancashire gathering more men of arms at every town and joined the Earl of Manchester. Then they brought the French to face them at Crecy, one of the most historical battles of all time. The English had the new technology of the day, bows and arrows, and of course easily won the battle.

All went well with Sir Robert and his son and there must have been many prayers of thankfulness raised when they rode back to Byspham. No doubt their war horses were not so frisky and their coats of arms a bit sullied, but they were alive.

Source: A lecture/talk given by Dr. Lucy Joan Slater, Editor and Secretary, Dalton Genealogical Society, Cambridge, England

FILE - Swinburne Manuscript Vol 5 - date: 13th - 19th centuries

Item: Lease (indented) - date: 11 Nov 1251

William de Milneburne leases to William son of Walter Taylor of Hoga all his land with toft and croft in the township of Newton for term of 4 years paying 5 silver shillings rent a year, half at Pentecost and half at St. Martin for all customs and exactions. Witnessed by lord Th. de Fenure, lord Symon de Difiliston, Patrick son of (?) Finnardus, Adam son of ( ?) Christiana, Robert de Dalton, Nicholas son of Alan, and Th. chaplain who wrote this deed.    

Children of Miss Lawrence and Sir Dalton are:

i.    Sir Henry De Dalton.

ii.   Ralph De Dalton.

iii.  Sir John De Dalton, born Abt. 1278 in Yorkshire, England; died in .

iv.  Sir Robert Dalton, born Abt. 1278 in Bispham, Lancashsire Co., England.

 

**********************************************************

Descendants of Dunning De Latham    Top

Generation No. 1

1. Dunning De Latham was born Abt. 1031 in Saxon, England, and died1092 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He married Marigard Essex 28 May 1068 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England. Marigard died during his birth and Dunning never remarried, and he died in 1092, of pneumonia.

Dunning de Latham was born circa 1031 at Saxon, England. He married Marigard ESSEX, 28 May 1068 at The Chapelry of Lathom, Lathom, Lancashire, England;2 died 12 Oct 1092 at Lathom House, Lathom, Lancashire, England; The Lathom House, the Chapelry of Lathom, and the town of Lathom itself would later become a part of the city of Ormskirk, Lancashire, England; buried 14 Oct 1092 at Chapelry of Lathom, Lathom, Lancashire, England.

Sir Dunning was a traitor to his Saxon heritage and was appointed by the Norman invaders as the first Norman Lord of Lathom. He was given the lordship of the Chapelry of Lathom and its' surrounds. The Lathom House, the Chapelry of Lathom and even the town of Lathom itself would later become a part of the city of Ormskirk, Lancashire, England. He and his wife, Lady Marigard De Essex are from the 2nd generation in an unbroken line of 35 generations. They share this distinction with Lord Henry De Chester, Jr. and his wife, Lady Helene Tudor. He died of pneumonia. The original meaning of the place name Lathom or Latham was 'the barn house,' which probably meant a warehouse or storehouse. The 2 earliest place names were the Chapelry of Lathom, in Lancashire, England; and the town of Latham, in Yorkshire, England. The first one to bear the Latham surname was a Saxon traitor named Dunning, who was living in Lancashire about the time of the Norman conquest in 1066 A.D. Because of his collaboration with the Normans and his betrayal of his Saxon heritage, the Normans rewarded Dunning with the lordship of the Chapelry of Lathom and its' surrounds, the title of Earl, and with a knighthood. Thus Dunning, traitor to the Saxon people; became Sir Dunning Latham, Earl of Lathom in the Spring of 1067 A.D. In both early English and American records, the surname of Latham or Lathom has taken on many different spellings. The most common of these are: Latham, Lathem, Lathim, Lathom, Lathome, Lathum, Laytham, Leatham, Leathom, Leetham, Leethem, Lethem, and Lethom. (The probable reason for these various spellings is the fact that so many of our early ancestors could neither read nor write. Whenever it was necessary for a name to be written down by someone who could read and write, it was sounded out by different people differently and over the years as literacy improved, the wrong spellings had become the traditional way the various families chose to spell it. The spelling Latham is the one that is the most common usage and is surely the original spelling. In early English history, 7 distinct clans of Lathams emerged and could be found in the following counties: Lancaster, which was Sir Dunnings direct descendants; York, Somerset, Chester, Essex, Worchester, Cambridge and in London. Over the years the Latham family has been very prolific, and many of them produced very large families indeed! The average sized Latham family has been between 7 to 10 children. Early families have been founded both by landed gentry and by the lower landless classes referred to as yeoman. Roots Research Ltd., The Name and Family of Latham, 1982. The Antiquities of Lancaster, 1869, by Gregson. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames, 1968.

The original meaning of the place name Lathom or Latham was "the barn-house". This probably referred to a type of warehouse. Its' first bearers to ok their family name from their place of residence as in John of Latham. So many of its first bearers took their surname from either of the fir st two places to bear the name. The Chapelry of Lathom in County Lancast er England and the town of Latham in Yorkshire are the first places to be ar the name.

The surname of LATHAM was a locational name 'of Lathom' a chapelry in the parish of Ormskirk, County Lancashire. Early records of the name mention Henry de Latham, County Somerset, during the reign of Edward III (1327-1377). Johannes de Lethom was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Edward Lathom of County Lancashire, registered at Oxford University in 1605. A locational name usually denoted where a man held his land, and indicated where he actually lived. The original bearer would take his name from the village, town or the area where he dwelt. This name would identify his whole family, and would follow them wherever they moved Following the Crusades in Europe a need was felt for a family name. This was recognized by those of noble blood, who realised the prestige and practical advantage that it would add to their status. Surnames before the Norman Conquest of 1066 were rare in England having been brought by the Normans when William the Conqueror invaded the shores. The practice spread to Scotland and Ireland by the 12th century, and in Wales they appeared as late as the 16th century. Most surnames can be traced to one of four sources, locational, from the occupation of the original bearer, nicknames or simply font names based on the first name of the parent being given as the second name to their child. In many parts of central and western Europe, hereditary surnames began to become fixed at around the 12th century, and have developed and changed slowly over the years. As society became more complex, and such matters as the management of tenure, and in particular the collection of taxes were delegated to special functionaries, it became imperative to distinguish a more complex system of nomenclature to differentiate one individual from another. The associated arms are recorded in Sir Bernard Burkes General Armory. Ulster King of Arms in 1884. The crest is depicted in the ancient windows of Astbury Church. In an old Visitation of the county of Lancashire, in the College of Arms, it is stated that a child was found in an eagle's nest upon the estate, and adopted by one of the Lathams. This, it is assumed, was the origin of the crest.

Child of Dunning De Latham and Marigard Essex is:

i.    Siward Fitz Dunning De Latham, born 04 Jul 1073 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England; died 09 Jan 1095 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England.

 

Generation No. 2

2. Siward Fitz Dunning De Latham was born 04 Jul 1073 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England, and died 09 Jan 1095 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He married Helga De Chester 22 Nov 1092 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England. She was born 04 Mar 1064 in Chestershire, England, and died 13 Dec 1094 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England.

Lathom is a village and civil parish in Lancashire, England, about 5 km northeast of Ormskirk. It is in the district of West Lancashire, and with the parish of Newburgh forms part of Newburgh ward. The Leeds and Liverpool Canal passes through Lathom.

Siward Fitz Dunning de Latham was born on Jul 4 1073 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He died on Jan 9 1095 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He was an Earl/ Lord of Lathom. Siward was very young when he was confirmed Earl of Lathom. He was only 19 years old. He was mainly confirmed Lord of Lathom, because of the ceaseless efforts of Lord Henry De Chester, Jr. Siward was confirmed Lord of Lathom on 11 Nov 1092 and married his wife only 11 days later. It is said never having known his own mother, Siward became very close to his father. He was said never to gotten over his father's death. He also couldn't get over his wife's and 2 daughters deathe, & committed suicide by hanging himself. Because he comitted suicide he wasn't allowed to be buried in the graveyard at the Chapelry Of Lathom. Instead he was buried in unblessed ground outside this cemetery. He was married to Helga De Chester on Nov 22 1092 in The Chapelry of Latham, Essex, England.

Child of Siward De Latham and Helga De Chester is:

i.    Lord Henry Fitz-Siward De Latham, born 27 Apr 1093 in Latham, Lancashire, England; died 12 Jun 1128 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He married Alice Woodward.

 

Generation No. 3

3. Lord Henry Fitz-Siward De Latham was born 27 Apr 1093 in Latham, Lancashire, England, and died 12 Jun 1128 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He married Alice Woodward.

Henry de Latham, Lord of Latham was born on Apr 27 1093 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He died on Jun 12 1128 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He was buried on Jun 14 1128 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He was an Earl/Lord of Lathom. Henry was named Earl of Lathom on his 21st birthday, 27 April 1114. It was often said of him that he began the fall of the Latham clan from the halls of power. He was quite unfaithful to his wife Lady Alice. He was a mean and abusive husband. He had a long term affair with Martha Jane Hargrove and he had divorced Lady Alice to marry her. On the very day of his 2nd wedding, he was riding horse back with the wedding party. He was galloping after Martha when he failed to duck under a tree limb. He was knocked from his horse and broke his neck.

Lady Alice with the help of her friends and relatives was able to get the marriage annulled because it was never "legally" consummated. Lady Alice was named regent for her son Robert. It is said of Martha Hargrove that she bore Lord Henry a bastard daughter 8 months after his death. He was married to Alice Woodward on Apr 24 1118 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England.

Henry de Latham, Lord of Latham, was father of:

1. Robert.

2. Richard, was a witness to his brother's foundation Charter of the Burscough priory, and used the Boteler arms with the Latham difference, with the addition of an eagle's leg erased. He was ancestor of the Torbocks of Torbock.

3. Roger.

Legend has it that the Lord of Lathom had no son born in wedlock but cunningly contrived to walk his lady through the Park one day to a grove of tall trees where the tiny infant of his begetting was waiting. Upon instruction, the baby's mother had dumped him there. The Lady ran to pick the baby up and took him home as companion for their own daughter. Soon the boy, Oskatel, had won his father's affections such that he was about to alienate all the Lathom's lands from the rightful heiress who had become betrothed to a member of the Stanley family. The Stanleys always chose heiresses for their sons, so they very soon told the Lord of Lathom what he must do. Finally, he was diverted from his purpose and on his death Lathom came, in marriage, to the Stanleys, who adopted the Eagle and Child as a badge, as a constant reminder how easily it may have been lost to them.

Alice Woodward, "Lady Alice" was born on Apr 4 1094 in Battersea, England. She died on Apr 14 1165 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. She was buried on Apr 15 1165 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. She was a Lady of Lathom/Regent. After marrying Lord Henry, Lady Alice went 5 years before giving birth to their fist child. Lord Henry was an abusive husband. These 2 facts earned her the nickname of "Poor Lady Alice." Following the birth of her second child, she was unable to conceive again. Lord Henry began cheating on her, and in 1127 took an almost unheard action of seeking a divorce using her inability to have more children as the basis.

Children of Lord De Latham and Alice Woodward are:

i.    Robert Henry De Latham, born 18 Aug 1123 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England; died 02 Dec 1185 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England.

ii.   Richard De Latham, born 31 Dec 1124 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England; died Bef. 1220 in France.

 

Richard Fitz-Henry de Latham was born on Dec 31 1124 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He died before 1220 in France. He was a Theive/Highwayman/Rogue. He moved to France in 1144 to escape the police in England a nd was never heard from again.

 

Generation No. 4

4. Robert Henry De Latham was born 18 Aug 1123 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England, and died 02 Dec 1185 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He married Emma De Grelle. She was born 1152 in Of Dalton, Lancashire, England, and died in .

Robert Henry Fitz Henry Latham was born on Aug 18 1123 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He died on Dec 2 1185 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He was buried on Dec 2 1185 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He was an Earl of Lathom. He died of Cholera.

Robert de Latham, also married, presumably, a daughter of Orme Magnus. The "Testa de Neville" states that Albert de Grelle, Baron of Manchester, gave to Orme, in marriage with his daughter Emma, about 1170, one knight's fee in Dalton, Parbold, and Wrightington, and one carucate of land in Eston. These estates came into possession of the Lathams who held them for many centuries. This Robert Latham (called Robert fitz Henry) was founder of Burscough priory, which was endowed by him with the churches of Ormskirk and Flixton, cira 1180.

The Priory of Burscough was founded for the order of Black Canons, in the reign of Richard I., its founder being Robert Fitz-Henry, Lord of Lathom, son of Henry de Torbock and Lathom, supposed to be a descendant from Orm; and Britton, in his Beauties of Lancashire, observes that its noble founder "endowed it with considerable property, emoluments, and alms; and, according to the weak superstition of the age, thought thereby to obtain pardon and rest for the souls of Henry the Second, John, Earl of Moreton, hirnself, his wife, and those of his ancestors; at the same time wishing the kingdom of Heaven to all persons who would increase the gift; and giving to the Devil and his Angels all who should impiously infringe on his bequests."

Robert Fitz-Henry, Lord of Lathom, so describes himself in his foundation charter of Burscough Priory between 1189-1199, endowing it with lands in Burscough, Merton, Lathom, etc., for the souls of Henry II, himself, his wife, parents and successors. Robert de Lathom died in or before 1201. The name of his wife does not appear, but it is evident from the records that she was the daughter and heiress of Orme FitzAlward, who had received Ormatone in marriage with Emma, daughter of Albert de Gredle, the Elder. Orme had inherited Ormskirk from Ormus Magnus, whose wife was Alix, sister of Herveus Walter, the ancestor of the Botelars,..."

Child of Robert De Latham and Emma De Grelle is:

i.    Sir Richard De Latham, born 1145 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England; died 23 Apr 1201 in Yorkshire, England.

 

Generation No. 5

5. Sir Richard De Latham was born 1145 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England, and died 23 Apr 1201 in Yorkshire, England. He married (1) Alice Nelson. She was born 22 May 1146 in Chelsea, Yorkshire, England, and died 23 Apr 1201 in Yorkshire, England. He married (2) Dora Wimple.

Richard Fitz-Robert de Latham was born on Mar 31 1145 in the Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He died on Apr 23 1201 in Yorkshire, England. He was buried on May 6 1201 in the Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He was confirmed Earl Of Lathom on 31 Mar 1184. Sir Robert was travelling with his wife, Lady Alice to visit her family in York, England. They were caught in a flash flood while trying to ford a creek just a few miles from York and drowned. It was several days before their bodies were found and returned to the Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England for burial. He was also known as Richard Robert Latham, Sr.

Alice Nelson was born on May 22 1146 in Chelsea, Yorkshire, England. She died on Apr 23 1201 in Yorkshire, England. She was buried on May 1 12 01 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. She was a Lady of York & Lathom. It should be noted that Lady Alice had several miscarriages between the births of her sons.

Child of Sir De Latham and Alice Nelson is:

i.    Sir Robert De Latham, born Abt. 1198 in Londonderry, England; died Bef. Sep 1286 in Lancashire, England.

 

Generation No. 6

6. Sir Robert De Latham was born Abt. 1198 in Londonderry, England, and died Bef. Sep 1286 in Lancashire, England. He married Amicia De Altreton 15 Dec 1220 in Chapelry Of Lathom, Lancaster, England. She was born 26 May 1200 in Newcastle, England, and died 11 Nov 1250 in Westminster, England.

Sir Robert de Latham, died before September 1286; married Amicia Alfeton, daughter of Robert de Alfeton, Lord of Alfreton, Norton and Marnham, a grandson of Robert fitz Ralph, founder of Beauchief Abbey. Sir Robert de Latham was High Sheriff of Lancaster, 1236, 1248, 1249 and again in 1263. He was Custos of the Castle and County of Lancaster during pleasure 1250, and of the honour of Lathom 1254. He was summoned for military service against Llewelyn in 1277, and fought against the Welsh in 1282.

He was married to Amicia De ALFRETON on Dec 15 1220 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England.

Amicia De ALFRETON was born on May 26 1200 in Newcastle, England. She died on Nov 11 1250 in Westminster, England of Pneumonia. She was buried on Nov 11 1250 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. She was a Lady De Alfreton. She was nicknamed " Aimiable Amicia" for her easygoing nature.

Amicia Alfeton, daughter of Robert de Alfeton, Lord of Alfreton, Norton and Marnham, a grandson of Robert fitz Ralph, founder of Beauchief Abbey.

Richard de Latham and Amicia De ALFRETON had the following children:

1. Robert.

2. Richard, of Parbold; married Dionysia de Marcy, daughter of Sir Harmon de Mascy of Dunham. He was one of the followers of the Earl of Lancaster in his rebellion, but was pardoned in 1313.

3. Henry; married Elena de Turton, granddaughter of Henry de Turton. Justice calls him "Henry Latham de Torbock."

4. Thomas, was grantee of Mosborough and lands in Raynsforth from his brother Sir Robert, in 1292. From him are descended the Lathams of Mosborough.

More About Sir Robert De Latham:

Record Change: 29 Mar 2009

More About Amicia De Altreton:

Record Change: 29 Mar 2009

Children of Sir De Latham and Amicia De Altreton are:

i.    Sir Robert De Latham; died 1325.

ii.   Sir Richard De Latham, born Abt. 1226 in Of Parbold, Lancashire, England; died in . He married Dionysia De Marcy.

iii.  Henry De Latham, born Abt. 1228 in Of Tarbock, Lancashire, England; died in . He married Elena De Turton.

iv.  Sir Thomas De Latham, born 12 Feb 1241 in Mosbortough, Lancashire, England; died in .

 

Generation No. 7

7. Sir Robert De Latham; died 1325. He married Katherine De Knowselegh.

Robert Ryan Fitz Richard LATHAM was born on ?, in Lancaster, England. He died on Jul 4 1302 in Lancaster, England. He was buried on Jul 6 1302 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. He was a Knight Of The Royal Garter. He was known historically as Sir Robert Latham, The Elder.

He was married to Katherine De Knowlesley on Jan 26 1267 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England.

Katherine De Knowlesley was born on May 7 1247 in Hazeltonford, England. She died on Sep 19 1277 in Lancaster, England. She was buried on Sep 20 12 77 in Chapelry of Lathom, Lancaster, England. She was a housewife/mother. Robert Ryan Fitz Richard LATHAM (DE LATHOM) and Katherine De Knowlesley had the following children:

i. Thomas Lemar Latham (DE LATHOM).

ii. Jane Janette Latham (DE LATHOM) was born on Mar 10 1270 in Lancaster, England. She died on Nov 14 1344 in St. Bernice Retreat, Wessex, England. She was buried on Nov 16 1344 in St. Bernice Cemetary, Wessex, England. She was a Nun. She was a nun. She entered the Order of St. Bernice in 1293.

Hugh Sebastion Latham (DE LATHOM) was born on Dec 14 1272 in Avonlea, England. He died on May 24 1294 in Igmar, Turkey. He was buried on May 25 12 94 in the Holy Martyrs Chapel, Igmar, Turkey. He was a Crusader/soldier. He fought and was killed in one of the last crusades.

iv. Phillip Andrew Latham (DE LATHOM).

More:

Robert de Latham, died 1325; married Katherine de Knowselegh, daughter of Sir Thomas de Knowselegh. Robert died 1325. Robert de Latham, Knight fought against the Scots in 1291, and in 1309, and was Commissioner of Array in the expedition against Robert the Bruce in 1307. In 1310 he was appointed a Justice of Oyer and Terminer, and in 1324, he was one of the Knights summoned to meet the Peers in the great council held at Westmoreland. He had charter of free warren in the manors of Lathom and Roby in 1303. At an inquest post mortem held in 1325, it was found he died seized of one Knight's fee in Childwall, 1/4 of a Knight's fee in Parbold, and 3/4 of a Knight's fee in Wrightington, held by the duke of Manchester, by inheritance from Orme Magnus.

Children:

Thomas, born 1301, died 14 September 1370; married Eleanor le Ferrers.

Joan; married first William de Holand, prior to October 1311; married second John de Bellew, prior to 18 November 1318; married third William de Scargill, prior to 28 January 1324; and married fourth William de Multon prior to 28 July 1325. She is mentioned in an Inquest Post Mortem held in 1385. Hugh, was granted the T'wp of Whittle by his father. Philip.

Children of Sir De Latham and Katherine De Knowselegh are:

i.    Thomas De Latham.

ii.   Joan De Latham.

iii.  Hugh De Latham.

 

Sir Thomas De Latham was born 12 Feb 1241 in Mosbortough, Lancashire, England. He married Samantha Maryanne Reeves.

Thomas was grantee of Mosborough and lands in Raynsforth from his brother Sir Robert, in 1292. From him are descended the Lathams of Mosbrough.

Children of Sir De Latham and Samantha Reeves are:

i.    Edward De Latham.

ii.   Robert De Latham.

iii.   Mary De Latham, born 1274 in Byspham, Lancashire, England; died in Byspham, Lancashire, England.

iv.  Richard Raymond, born 30 Apr 1284.

 

Generation No. 8

8. Mary De Latham was born 1274 in Byspham, Lancashire, England, and died in Byspham, Lancashire, England. She married Sir Robert Dalton, son of Sir Dalton and Miss Lawrence. He was born Abt. 1278 in Bispham, Lancashsire Co., England, and died in .

Latham is the name of several small towns in England. It developed from two words: "layth," a barn, and "ham," an enclosed field. People in Medieval England tended to stay in one area all their lives, so it was not unusual for them to take their names from the place where they lived. Sometimes a family would take possesssion of an estate and call it after their surname.

Leatham and Leathom are two older spellings of the name, which may also mean, "the house near the barn". "Ham" in Middle English could mean either house or enclosed field depending on the pronunciation. One of the first appearance of the name on English records was in the year 1266.

Spelling variations include: Latham, Lathem, Lathom and others.

First found in Lancashire where they were seated from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

The History of Sir Robert Dalton, Knight and Administrator

Sir Robert is the first direct Dalton ancestor whose life is documented in some detail. The documentation comes about because he was actively engaged in public affairs during the reigns of Edward II and Edward III. His father was Sir Richard de Dalton, the somewhat legendary ancestor whose exploits crusading earned the green griffin crest for his family. The dates of Sir Robert are given by one pedigree as 1284 to 1350.

Sir Robert had the upbringing appropriate to his position in feudal society and appears to have been knighted at a young age. He succeeded to his inheritance at the death of his father in 1293; owning land, largely in the Hundred of Leyland at Bispham and Dalton. Land in the latter manor was held with the Holland family. In references to Sir Robert in the official records, various members of the Holland family are often associated with activities of the Daltons. Up-Holland their original manor is close to both Bispham and Dalton but the families were not only neighbors but very probably related. Their coat of arms were only distinguished by the cross-lets of the Daltons and the fleur de lis of the Hollands. Mrs. Leaning produces further evidence of such a link, "in one manuscript pedigree, drawn up by an unknown hand, our pedigree it surfaced by several of the Hollands, one of them Adam being the immediate progenitor of the first de Dalton".

Sir Robert was one of the knights in the train of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster Edward II's cousin. He is mentioned in various deeds relating to the Earl's affairs and another relation John de Dalton was the Earl's bailiff. The "favorite knight" of the Earl, however, was Sir Robert de Holland on whom was lavished lands and money. Sir Robert was created a Baron in 1314.

The Earl of Lancaster was one of the great landed magnates of England and he became a focal point for the growing opposition to Edward II's unsuccessful regime. The loss of Scotland and the corruption of the government by the favorites of the King, who incidentally was a homosexual, were more than many feudal notables couldn't stand and rebellion followed. Lancaster, however, made the mistake of trying to enlist the support of the Scots and this rallied some otherwise wavering nobles to the support of the King.

Thomas, The Earl of Lancaster, had been raised to an even greater position, and was in fact among the most powerful nobles in the realm. He was of the blood royal, and within seven generations could count 5 kings as his direct ancestors, to say nothing of Rollo, duke of Normandy and Charles III of France, before William the Conqueror.

In 1320 our Sir Robert Dalton was one of the witnesses to a charter granted by the Earl and it was not at all surprising that when the Earl used force to separate the weak King from his favorites that a conclusive family like the Dalton'' should be in the Earl's party. But the results were disastrous. Not all of the Earl's broad land, or his great popularity, or even his kinship with Royalty availed to save him. When a great man falls, so do other lesser one's fall with him.

The rebellion was defeated at the Battle of Boroughbridge in Yorkshire in l322 and Sir Robert de Dalton fought with the Earl. Sir Robert de Holland, however, arrived too late with his reinforcements and then, seeing the Earl's cause was lost, wasted no time in pillaging the belongings of the Earl's supporters, taking goods to the value of £1,000. He made his peace with the King and advanced in royal favor. In 1328, however, the followers of the Earl had their revenge and he was ambushed and killed. His head was sent to the new Earl of Lancaster as a symbol of revenge .

Thus in July of 1322, we find our Sir Robert Dalton in big trouble. An order was issued by the King to Thomas Deyvill, constable of Pontefract Castle, to receive Phillip de la Beche, John de Acton, Robert Dalton and John Blaket as prisoners. Sir Robert was arrested and imprisoned in the dungeons of Pontefract Castle and his lands forfeited. The Earl was executed and many of his supporters hanged, but Sir Robert escaped with one year's imprisonment and a small fine which was after-wards canceled. The Holland connection may have helped in this respect.

During the next twelve months must have been a black year for our Sir Robert. His land had been lost, his wife and little son, living one supposes, on sufferance, and his friends clearly making frantic efforts to raise the great sum necessary for his ransom.

On August 12th, 1323, the King "ordered Richard de Mosele, Constable of Pontefract Castle to release Sir Robert, Knight, a late rebel from prison in that Castle, so that he may come to the King to make security for his good behavior, hereafter, as certain persons have prayed the King to deliver him and to have made security for 100 marks, where-in they made fine to save the said Sir Robert's life"

A week later, the King come to further order: " to John de Lancastre. Keeper of certain rebels land in the County of Lancaster, to deliver to Sir Robert Dalton, Knight, his lands as he has made ransom to the King for his life and lands.

Sir Robert Dalton made good use of his restoration to favor, for three years later he is found holding the position of keeper of the Kings Royal Forest at Blakeburnshire Chase on the borders of Lancashire and Yorkshire.

Sir Robert's military talents were also put to use and he was connected with the Bishop of Durham, the Earl of Derby, Henry de Percy and Ralph de Ne ville, in organizing the defense of Northern England. He also served abroad since, in April 1341, he received a payment of £46 "for wages in the King's services beyond the seas".

In Nov. 1343, and to Feb. 1346, Sir Robert held the lucrative position of Constable of the Tower of London, The Kings most important prison. He was not continuously in residence there as some of the directives he received about his duties refer to Sir Robert "or to him who supplies his place there". He relinquished his position in 1346 and received a grant of the "farm revenue" of Apthorpe in Northamptonshire which amounted to 40 a year.

Leaving the Tower, Sir Robert immediately resumed his military career and joined Edward III in the invasion of France. He was present at the Battle of Crecy in 1346 and the Seige of Calais. Among his relatives and connections accompanying the King were the inevitable de Hollands, Sir William de Dalton, Controller of the King's Household and later his Treasurer, and John de Dalton, the Royal Sergeant-at-Arms.

The Daltons obviously enjoyed royal favor and may well have advanced together with the Hollands. The two sons of the lst Baron de Holland had both become barons and the younger brother Thomas was one of the founder Knights of the Garter in 1348. A few years later, he made a royal marriage becoming the first of the three husbands of Joan Plantagenet, "the Fair Maid of Kent". His two sons were half brothers to the King, Richard II, the son of Joan's third husband, the Black Prince. The elder son, Thomas, became Earl of Kent and his son Thomas was created Duke of Surrey in 1599. The younger son, John, became Earl of Huntingdon and, afterwards, Duke of Exeter and married Elizabeth Plantegenet, the daughter of John of Gaunt.


Sir John's Raid:

There now took place the most dramatic incident in the Dalton's annals that ever occurred. It was known as the Sir John's Raid. Sir John was the son of Sir Robert and by this fact Sir Robert was blamed unfairly for the deed that occurred.

Sir John Dalton with the aid of Baron Robert de Holland and four other Knights, abducted a married women from her home, killing her Uncle, a Priest and various servants, terrified some of the Royal children who were staying there and stole valuables worth 1,000 pounds. Sir John married the lady the same day and fled northwards to take refuge with the Hollands at Up-Holland. Afterwards he got a ship to take him and the lady overseas. Sir Robert, however, was not so fortunate. He was arrested and sent to the Tower of London and his lands were seized, this was in 1347. Once again the Holland connection may have helped. Sir Robert was released in May 1348 and his lands restored. His wife's name is also given in the document of pardon; the only reference to her existence. She was Mary Latham, daughter of Sir Thomas Latham, a Lancashire neighbor. Sir John also emerged from the whole business more or less unscathed. In 1350 he was pardoned, and only one month later even more surprisingly was granted an annuity of £50 a year, so "that he may the better maintain himself in the King's service". The service was in the French Wars and Sir John is mentioned in connection with various incidents in the Hundred Years War. (See the full explanation of this affair in the History of Sir John Dalton)

Sir Robert, however, died in the year his son was restored to favor, at the age of 64. He had survived wars and rebellions, the Black Death of 1348 and to periods of imprisonment. He must have been quite a tough character by any standards. He appears to have discharged his administrative posts effectively and have acquired quite a reputation as a soldier. How much he owed all this to the Holland connection is not clear, but this brief account of a man's career 600 years ago gives some impression of the risks and uncertainties of Medieval Life

Source: by Mrs. Morag Simpson; from an article in Vol. 5, page 22, of T he DGS Journal.

And from the "Dalton Book" By Mrs. Frances Edith Leaning (Dalton)

Found in the Book: 942.7 B4lc Vol. 54.

Title: LANCASHIRE INQUESTS, EXTENTS and FEUDAL AIDS.

PART ll. A.D. 1310 - 1333. II EDW. 11 No. 4.

To John Travers, keeper of certain contrariants lands in Co. Lancaster. As the king learns by inquest taken by the keeper and by John de Lancastre that William de Hoton at Martinmas in the 11th year [1317] demised to Robert de Dalton for life, 3 messuages and 60 acres of land in Maudesleye, rendering therefor 6 marks yearly and that the Messuges and lands were seised into the king's hands on Saturday before the Annunciation in the 15th year [20 March, 1322], and that William them them of John Flemy ng by homage and fealty and the service of 2s. yearly and that they are worth 82s. yearly in all issues and that they were scised into the king's hands because Richard (sic) was with Thomas, late earl of Lancaster, and adhered to him and that William was seised of the rent aforesaid without changing his estate therein from the time of the demise until the said Saturday; the king orders the keeper to satisfy William for the arrears of the rent from the time when the tenements were taken into the king's hands and to pay him the same whilst they so remain.

17 August 1326, Pickering. Of those who have made fines with the king to ave their lives and to have their lands, to wit: Robert de Dalton, knight, of the county of Lancaster, of late the king’s enemy and rebel, and on that account taken and detained in prison, has made fine in 100 marks to save his life and have his lands, whereof he will pay at the exchequer a moiety at Christmas next and a moiety at Easter following, and for payment thereof has found as mainpernors John de Bulmere, Thomas le Taillour of Pykeryng, of the county of York, and Adam de Asshurst of the county of Lancaster, each of whom has mainprised therefor and for Robert’s good behaviour, as is contained on the dorse.

8 March 1341, Westminster. Commitment during pleasure to Robert de Dalton, for good service, of the keeping of the Tower of London, with the usual fees. Order to William Lenlis, late keeper, to deliver the same to him, with the prisoners, arms, victualls and all other things therein.

Source: Calendar of the Fine Rolls, Part I, Extracted by Michael Cayley, D GS Archivist.


VICTORIA COUNTY HISTORIES of LANCASHIRE:

Vol. 3 page 151 - 1347

Robert de Dalton had lands in Halewood. His son Sir John, Lord of Bispham, did too. By a settlement dated 1367, the remainders went to Sir John's sons, John and Robert. The property consisted of a house, garden and 40 acres at a rent of 7s a year. In 1443 Robert, younger son of Sir John Dalton and grandson of another Sir John Dalton, sued Katherine, widow of his elder brother Richard, in connection with these lands, and his niece Alice was called to warrant her mother.

1291- Robert de Dalton mentioned (Inq. and extracts 276)

1305- Robert de Dalton claimed common of pasture from Ellen, widow of Henry de Lathom, and prior of Burscough. He allowed the prior to approve in the hey of Dalton.

Another Dalton family held land from the Torbocks: Gilbert son of Alan de Dalton refers to "my Lord, Henry de Turbock" [VCH gives no date].

Vol. 3 page 254 - 1323

Emma, wife of Robert de Taldeford, claimed lands at Taldeford (a hamlet near Lathom) from Sir Robert de Dalton of Bispham and his wife Mary and Robert de Bispham.

Calendar of the Memoranda Rolls (Exchequer), Michaelmas 1326 – Michaelm as 1327, pub HMSO 1968.

17 Feb 1327. Quittance to Robert de Dalton, an adherent of Thomas late earl of Lancaster, of the balance of his fine of 100m. for life and lands. Westminster, 17 Feb. (Allowed in Notts.)

Sir Robert Dalton of Bispham Manor:

If you look at the southwest section of a map of Lancashire there is several Lancashire villages named Dalton. Also nearby is the village of Bispham, (not seen) - one of three in England. The Amery De Biscop family held lands in these villages and one of them is located north of Dalton, formerly known as Biscopham, and nowadays designated as Bispham, with the centre shown on the map as Bispham Green. The distance between these two points on the map is about six miles.

Our Dalton Legend states that Sire de Dalton allegedly arrived in England in 1154 and was the father of this clan. Although pedigrees exist and there are mentions in the Close Rolls, constructing a time line for these early Daltons is difficult. Records of possession of Bispham Hall by Daltons do give a calendar of their presence. In the records there is a space of 36 years from Biscop family possession in 1288 to the possession by a Dalton in 1324. Thus is recorded that Sir Robert de Dalton, took possession of Bispham Hall in 1324 and was followed by his son Sir John, in 1369. Sir Robert was also recorded to be of Pickering in Yorkshire and held an interest in Croston Hall as well.

The lands of Bispham village numbered about 900 acres in the 14th Century and today number about 1000 acres. Occupancy of Bispham Hall by a succession of Daltons lasted from 1324 to 1558, when Sir Robert Dalton (later of Thurnham) transferred his interest to William Stopford. During 238 years of known Dalton occupancy, at least 9 generations of Daltons, some with fairly large families, descended from Sir Robert. It was inevitable that they migrated into the surrounding areas for their livelihood.

Bispham was originally in the Parish of Croston as was the adjacent small village, Mawdesley. Records show the purchase of land by the Bispham Daltons at Bentley Carre in Mawdesley where farming was of prime importance and basket making was also a trade of the Daltons. The distance between Bispham and Croston is about two and a half miles.

Besides being part owners of Croston Hall, Daltons owned land and farmed in Croston. Records show the sale of tenements in Croston by Sir Robert and his mother Margaret, prior to purchasing the Manor at Thurnham. Our branch shows the family ownership of the same farms in Croston for almo st 400 years from 1609. Because they were landowners, rather than agricultural labourers, the land tended to remain in the possession of descendants, usually the eldest son. Many descendants of this family remain in Croston and Mawdesley today.

As you study the Ordnance Survey along with Birth and Marriage records, they show that in the 16th Century, Daltons inhabited many of the villages surrounding Bispham and Dalton. Some went east to Standish and were raising families there before Myles Standish travelled to North America. Others went to Coppull and Chorley and into Eccleston. And in a wider circle went on to Preston, Burnley, Thurnham, etc.

Just south of Dalton is the village of Up Holland. The De Hollands’ and Daltons’ were close friends. It was here that a De Holland hid Sir John after his dastardly act. Records show that marriages were performed between Daltons and Hollands up to the 16th Century. As you study the Ordnance Survey, note the number of Halls that appear on the map. The lords of the manors were not only friends and entertained, but their children intermarried. One Hall missing from the map is Park Hall, now the base for a Theme Park, located at the side of M6 "motel" near Charnock Richard, and important because of a Dalton/Parke union.

This is the area from where the ancestors to many of us originated, and where they remained for over 700 years. It is an area of narrow country roads, lined with tall hedges. There are numerous farms and small clusters of brick houses. It is a quiet place interrupted only by the sound of farm machinery in a field, or the pealing of church bells. People are friendly, and many ancient customs and traditions are still uninterrupted by the march of time.


Notes on Sir Robert Dalton:

Lancashire Quarter Sessions - PETITIONS - MAWDESLEY.

FILE - DDL 514 - date: 14 Jun. 1332

Grant: Roger, son of Hugh of Moudeslegh to Sir Richard of Halsall, chaplain -- all properties in Moudeslegh except a messuage and garden which William son of Robertthe Fisher holds and an orchard adjoining and 3 selions abutting thereon, and lac. of land in the Greves held by Richard Hammonson -- Witn. Sir John Flemmyng, Sir William, lord of Lee, Sir Robert, lord of Dalton, Adam Banastre of Bonk, Robert of Thorpe, Thomas of Lee, War in Banastre, Johnson of Alan of Moudeslegh, Richard of Kyrkham, clerk and others. Given at Moudeslegh, Sunday, after St. Barnabus the Apostle, 6 E dward III.

FILE - DDL 515 - date: 4 Oct. 1332

Grant: Sir John Flemmyng to Warin Banastre of Moudeslegh and Thomas and John his sons -- 2 ac. of waste in M., lying in Longeschagh between the hey of Warin and the moss of Moudeslegh -- paying 2/- rent. Witn. Sir Robert, lord of Dalton, Sir John, lord of Heskeyth, Robert of Thorpe, Thomas of Lee, Roger, son of Hugh, Richard of Kyrkham, clerk and others. Given at Croston, Sunday after St, Michael the Archangel, 6 Edward III.

MAWDESLEY

FILE - DDHE 26/10 - date: 19 May 1344.

Quitclaim: Roger son of Henry of Bispham to Sir Robert, lord of Dalton -- property in Moudislegh had from William of Hoton and Sir John of Hoton -- Witn: Waryn Banastre, William Banastre of Brethyrton, Robert of Tho p, Thomas of the Legh, Robert of Bispham, and others. Given at Bispham, Wed. after Ascension, 18 Ed. III. Round red seal, Paschal lamb.

FILE - DDL 517 - date: 1 May 1348

Grant: Robert son of John de Hole of Moudeslegh to Johnson of Warin Banas tre of Moudeslegh -- a moiety of land in Longeshagh next to Hankesbrok, abutting on land of Robert, lord of Dalton, to the east, and on the Gaghles to the west; also 2 ac. and a house on the south of the Hankesbrok, in the town of Croston and hamlet of Moudeslegh -- with remainder to Richard brother of John. Witn. Adam Banastre of the Bonk, Robert of Thorpe, Roger of... , Richard of Heskyn, Richard son of Adam of Moudeslegh, Richard son of Roger son of Hugh of Moudeslegh and others. Given at Moudeslegh, 1 May, 22 Edward III.

More About Sir Robert Dalton:

Record Change: 29 Mar 2009

Children of Mary De Latham and Sir Dalton are:

i.    Sir John Dalton I, born Abt. 1302 in Of Bispham & Pykerying Lancashire, England; died 1369 in Lancashire, England.

ii.   William Dalton, born Abt. 1305 in Byspham, Lancashire, England; died 08 Mar 1372.

 

********************************************************

Descendants of Hubert Huse Of Normandy    Top

Generation No. 1

1. Hubert Huse of Normandy was born Abt. 1000, and died Abt. 1066. He married Helena 'Le Bon' Of Normandy. She was born Abt. 1020.

By family tradition the English Husseys were Normans, earlier Danes, and prior to that, Scandinavians who had invaded northern France and, settling there, adapted to French language and custom.

According to Stapleton's "Rotulli Scaccarii Normanniae," Osbert de Hozu, who was living in England in 1180, was so named for le Hozu, a fief in the parish of Grand Quevilly near Rouen, France. Adella Whitney Olney, a genealogist of Niland, California, suggests that the name may be derived from Heusse in the department of La Manche, France. In an old account of the Hussey family the name is said to have been Touasi de Hosa. German and French versions render it as de Hoese and de Hosey. In early medieval England the name Hussey was usually spelled Hose. In the Latin form it was Hosatus. During the thirteenth century it tended to evolve into Hoese, later to Huse and Husee and ultimately to Hussey.

The Hussey family, after the conquest, was seated in Dorsetshire, according to "Directory of Ancestral Heads of New England Families, 1620-170 0" by Frank P. Holmes.

Members of the family were frequently found in the early records of Berkshire, Wiltshire and Somersetshire, according to "Genealogical Dictiona ry of Maine and NewHampshire"

by Charles Thornton Libby.

A boot frequently appears in the various coats of arms of the Hussey families. It is suggested by John Horace Round in his "The King's Serjeants" [ 1911] that it was the boot or "hose" that gave the family its name. It is noted that the Husseys traditionally were boot butlers to the kings of England, and it is also noted that the Husseys were wine stewards to the royal families.

If it could be found in Round's scholarly research where a Hussey, a Hose, a de la Huse or a Hosatus served a king who drank wine from a boot, then all the problems as to the source of the Hussey name could be solved in one fell swoop.

The earliest claimed progenitor of the Hussey family in Normandy is Hugh Hussey who in 1014 was married to a daughter of the third Earl of Normandy, who is conjectured to be a descendant of Rollo of Normandy.

Children of Hubert Normandy and Helena Normandy are:

i.    William Hussey, born Abt. 1030.

ii.   Walter Hussey, born Abt. 1035.

Walter Hussey, believed to be a son of Hugh Hussey was born about 1035 in Normandy. It is presumed that he and his brothers, William Hussey, and John Hussey accompanied William theConqueror in his invasion of England and participated in the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

It is suggested that Walter Hussey was given land in Somersetshire as h is portion of the spoils of conquest. He and his brother, William Huss ey were listed as residents in the vicinity of Bath, Somersetshire in "Domesday Book" compiled in 1088. Walter Hussey held Little Sutton manor " of William de Mohun," according to the volume. 

iii.  John Hussey, born Abt. 1038.

 

Generation No. 2

2. William Hussey was born Abt. 1030.

William Hussey, believed to be a son of Hugh Hussey, was born about 1030 in Normandy. It is presumed that he accompanied William the Conquer or in his invasion of England and participated in the Battle of Hastings in 1066. It is suggested that he held land in Somersetshire, probably Sanford manor, as his portion of the spoils of conquest. He and his brother, Walter Hussey were listed as residents of Somersetshire in 1080 living in the vicinity of Bath, according to "Domesday Book."

Child of William Hussey is:

i.    Hugh Hussey, born Abt. 1070.

 

Generation No. 3

3. Hugh Hussey was born Abt. 1070, and died in .

Hugh Hussey, believed to be a son of William Hussey, was born about 1070 probably at Sanford manor, Somersetshire. He is identified as the progenitor of Henry Hussey in "History of Berkshire." He is believed to have held land in Sussex in 1100.

Child of Hugh Hussey is:

i.    Henry Hussey, born Abt. 1110.

 

Generation No. 4

4. Henry Hussey was born Abt. 1110.. He married Avice Tisun.

Henry Hussey, son of Hugh Hussey, was born about 1110, probably at Sanford manor, according to "Complete Peerage." He was married about 1145 to Avice Tisun, daughter of Adam Tisun. Henry Hussey was a witness to a charter of King Henry II restoring Cannings manor April 13, 1149. He and his brother, William Hussey, were witnesses to a deed of the Earl of Essex about 1150, according to "Manuscripts of the Bishop of London." Henry Hussey founded the Premonstatensian Abbey of Dureford in Sussex in 1169, and he founded a leper colony at Harting manor. Henry Hussey gave the chapel of Standen manor to the Abbey of Dureford about 1171.

About 1173 Henry Hussey made a grant of tithes at "Littetuna" [probably Li ttleton Paynell manor in Wiltshire] to the House of St. Martin of Jumiell es [or Jumieges] in the Diocese of Bayeau.

Henry Hussey also held Standen Hussey [or South Standen] manor, receiving the property because of his support of King Henry II, according to "History of Berkshire." He and his son, Geoffroy Hussey were involved in the "tenancy of Stapleford manor and in the breach of Southampton" about 1175, according to "History of Wiltshire."

When King Richard I [the Lionhearted] came to power in 1189, he immediately organized the Third Crusade to wrest the Holy Land from the infidels. Henry Hussey, in spite of his advanced age and probably to make a good impression upon the new king, joined the expedition. Before he left he deeded the rent from a mill at Littleton, Wiltshire to Dureford Abbey, according to "History of Wiltshire."

The army sailed by sea in the fall of 1190 with a plan to winter on the island of Sicily in the Mediterranean. Henry Hussey died about 1191 in the Holy Land, either in battle or because of the hardships of the crusade, according to "Complete Peerage."

Child of Henry Hussey and Avice Tisun is:

i.    Henry Hussey, born Abt. 1147; died Abt. 1211.

 

Generation No. 5

5. Henry Hussey was born Abt. 1147, and died Abt. 1211. He married Clementina De Port.

Henry Husey, son of Henry Hussey and Avice Tisun Hussey, was born about 1147 in Sussex. Upon the death of his father he inherited Standen Hussey manor. He was married about 1172 to Clementina de Port, daughter of Jo hn de Port. About 1191 he confirmed the deed of his father of "15s rent from a mill in Littleton" to Dureford Abbey, according to "History of Wiltshire." In the charter he mentioned his wife, "Clemence, daughter of J hn de Port" and his mother. In 1211 Henry Hussey relinquished title, " by fine" of land in Averham that was transferred to the Abbot of Rufford. The condemned land adjoined that of his uncle, William Tisun, and dispute arose as to whether the land being transferred took in some of the property of William Tisun.

Henry Hussey held Upton manor, Buckinghamshire in 1210, according to "History of Buckinghamshire." He also held property in Wiltshire in 1204, as evidenced in the "Great Roll of Pipe."

Henry Hussey died about 1211.

Child of Henry Hussey and Clementina De Port is:

i.    Henry Hussey, born Abt. 1177.

 

Generation No. 6

6. Henry Hussey was born Abt. 1177. He married Cecily De Stanton.

Henry Hussey, son of Henry Hussey and Clementina de Port Hussey, was born about 1177. Upon the death of his brother, William Hussey he inheri ed Standen Hussey manor. "Complete Peerage" shows him receiving it as an heir of his father. Title to Upton manor had been transferred to him in 1211. He was married about 1200 to Cecily de Stanton, daughter of Emma de Stanton, according to "Honors and Knights' Fees" by Thomas Henry Farrer.

In 1213 Henry Hussey gave 100 marks [67 pounds sterling] to obtain his father's land in Wiltshire. He joined the rebellion against the inept and unpopular King John, was arrested and all his lands were confiscated. When King Henry III came to the throne after the death of King John in 1216 the property of Henry Hussey in Hampshire, Wiltshire, Berkshire and Nottinghamshire were returned to him. In 1219 Henry Hussey "rendered account of two marks for one knight's fee [or smallest fief granted by the king] in Littleton," according to "History of Wiltshire."

On May 4, 1227 King Henry III confirmed to Cecily de Stanton Hussey Eling manor, Southampton [later called Hampshire], according to "Records of the College Winchester." On May 5, 1229 Henry Hussey and Cecily de Stant on Hussey were defendants in an assize [court trial] held at Winchester regarding a dam they had built on their property. Henry Hussey was a witness to the grant of a mill at Ford, Somersetshire about 1230, according to "Calendar of State Papers."

Henry Hussey died before April 1, 1235. On April 29, 1235 Cecily de Stant on Hussey "who was the wife of Henry Huose" had livery of Eling manor in the 19th year of the rule of King Henry III. She died before May 16, 1236. In 1376 it was recorded in "Patent Rolls" that Henry Hussey had received Eling manor from Sir Ralph Carroys and later transferred it to Sir Hugh Carroys. Dates of the transfers were not given.

Child of Henry Hussey and Cecily De Stanton is:

i.    Matthew Hussey, born Abt. 1205; died 1252.

 

Generation No. 7

7. Matthew Hussey was born Abt. 1205, and died 1252. He married Agnes De Saunford.

Matthew Hussey, son of Henry Hussey and Cecily de Stanton was born about 1205, probably in Wiltshire. He was married probably in the latter part of 1234 to Agnes de Saunford, daughter of Hugh de Saunford and Joan de Saunford. Marriage of Agnes de Saunford had been arranged in November 1233 to Robert Lupus, but on April 5, 1234 her mother paid a fine of 40 marks "and received license for Agnes to marry whom she pleased, " according to "Complete Peerage." The fine was reduced by 20 marks shortly afterwards at the request of John de Plessis who had married the older sister of Agnes de Saunford. Joan de Saunford was pardoned the remaining 20 marks of the find December 1, 1237.

In 1242-43 Matthew Hussey held three fees in Harting manor, Sussex of the Earl of Arundel. In 1244 he granted to the Abbot of Dureford land in South Moreton, Shalbourne and Sandon manors in Berkshire; Ham and Hungerford manors in Buckinghamshire and the chapelry of Standen Hussey manor in Wiltshire, along with other property. In 1252 he had a grant from King Henry III of free warren [small game hunting rights] in Harting manor.

On February 6, 1252-53 the sheriff and coroners of Buckinghamshire and Kent were ordered "to proceed with the partition of the lands that had belonged to Joan de Saunford in Missenden manor, etc, descending by hereditary right to Hugh de Plessis, son of John de Plessis, Earl of Warwick, and to Agnes, wife of Matthew Hose, the other heir of said Joan," according to "Complete Peerage." Matthew Hussey would appear to have been living at that time and was certainly alive January 9, 1252-53, but died before February 14 of that year. On February 27, 1253 King Henry III instructed the escheators in Berkshire, Sussex and Wiltshire to "sow the lands late of Matthew Hussey which are in the King's hand and the wardship where of belongs to the King," according to "Calendar of Liberate Rolls."

"Agnes, late wife of Matthewe Huse, in her widowhood, gave 3 1/2 virgates of land in Missenden manor to Missenden Abbey, with consent of her son and heir, Henry Huse," according to "Missenden Abbey Records." It is believed that Agnes de Saunford Hussey died about 1268.

Child of Matthew Hussey and Agnes De Saunford is:

i.    Henry Hussey, born 01 Aug 1240; died 23 Jul 1290.

 

Generation No. 8

8. Henry Hussey was born 01 Aug 1240, and died 23 Jul 1290. He married (1) Joan Le Fleming, daughter of Alard Le Fleming. He married (2) Margaret 1279. She died 1279. He married (3) Agnes 05 Nov 1280.

Sir Henry Huse in 1280 was fined 100 pounds and imprisoned for poaching deer in Pember Forest. He was later pardoned. King Edward I, influenced by his wife Margaret, forgave him part of the fine and ordered the balance to be paid to the Friar Preachers of London to help build their new church. Margaret, a daughter of Philip III of France, may have been a relative of Henry Huse. Through this name Huse, some people named Hussey may be able to claim kinship with the Plantagenets and other early royal families.

O'Hosey, Hussey. Gaelic names are given common English surnames of somewhat similar sound. Hussey is one of the few examples of a Norman name thus adopted. In Ireland today, Husseys are a branch of the Norman family of Houssaye in France, first called de Hose and de Hosey. The first to settle in Ireland came with Strongbow (Strongbow's Invasion, 12th Ce ntury) and acquired through Hugh de Lacy extensive lands near Dublin. Sir Hugh Hussey, Kt., was summoned to the Irish Parlament of 1294, as such his heirs for many generations were so styled, but it was not recognized as a peerage by the English crown.

Henry Hussey, son of Matthew Hussey and Agnes de Saunford Hussey, was born August 1, 1240, according to "Complete Peerage." He appeared as a 13-year-old on August 1, 1253 at the Feast of St. Peter ad vincula, "the son and heir of Matthew Hoese who held Harting manor, Sussex and who was son and heir of Cecily Hoese, deceased, who held lands at Eling, Hampshire."

On March 3, 1252-53 the lands and marriage of Henry Hussey were granted in custody to John Maunsell, "provost of Beverly and treasurer of York ," shortly after the death of his father. On January 9, 1252-53 there had been a ratification of covenants made between John Maunsell and Matthew Hussey regarding a marriage between Henry Hussey and Joan le Fleming, d aughter of Alard le Fleming and Emma Maunsell le Fleming, sister to John Maunsell, according to "Honors and Knights' Fees." Alard le Fleming held Pulborough manor in Sussex and Sapperton manor in Gloucestershire. There was also included in the agreement an arrangement where John Maunsell would find a suitable husband for an unnamed daughter of Matthew Hussey.

Henry Hussey witnessed a land charter October 8, 1259, according to "Knights of Edward I." He and some friends were arrested for hunting in the kin g's private domain in Bernwood Forest. They received a pardon for their trespass February 14, 1262-63. On September 16, 1264 he received orders with others to come with horses and arms to Pevensy, Sussex to guard the coast during the Barons War. After the Battle of Evesham in Worcestershire fought on August 4, 1265 Henry Hussey led forces which captured Belaune manor, Hampshire and restored it to Sir Nicholas de Vaux, according to "Knights of Edward I." After the defeat of the barons under Simon de Montford, Earl of Leicester, "the king's enemy," Henry Hussey seized Chauton manor at Finchesdon, Hampshire "for the use of Prince Edward." He was ordered to "cede Porchester Castle" in the service of King Edward I November 24, 1265. He was listed as the owner of lands near Winchester, Hampshire February 27, 1266.

On April 9, 1266, at the instance of Prince Edward, he had license to enclose a place at Harting manor "with dike and wall of stone and lime and to crenellate the same." Henry Hussey was listed as the owner of lands at Winchelsea, Sussex February 27, 1266. On January 30, 1267-68 he and Robert de Rogate, the king's serjeant, an officer below the rank of knight who enforced the commands of the court, received a grant of a yearly fair at Rogate, Sussex.

In 1270 he held Standen Hussey manor, according to "History of Wiltshire ." On December 12, 1270 he witnessed the charter of Queen Eleanor. On August 29, 1271 he had a grant of a weekly market at Harting manor and a yearly fair there. At that time he and his heirs received free warren in his demesne lands in Harting manor, Sussex; Freefolk manor, Hampshire; Tidworth manor, Hampshire and Wiltshire; South Moreton manor, Berkshire; Missenden manor, Buckinghamshire; Chiggeshul manor, Chilteston manor, Deane manor and Stourmouth manor in Kent and Standen manor in Berkshire and Wiltshire.

In 1275 the heirs of Henry le Fleming, brother of Alard le Fleming, were named as Henry Hussey and Joan le Fleming and Walter de L'Isle and his wife, Florence le Fleming de L'Isle, sister to Joan le Fleming. Joan le Fleming Hussey died about 1278 "when liberties at Rudgwick manor in Sussex were claimed by Walter de L'Isle and Florence de L'Isle and Henry Husee," according to "Honors and Knights' Fees." This Henry Hussey was the son of Henry Hussey and the heir to his mother's property. Queen Eleanor, the Spanish wife of King Henry VIII, was holding half of the inheritance because enry Hussey was under age. In 1281 Walter de L'Isle acknowledged a debt of 11 pounds yearly to Queen Eleanor during the minority of Henry Hussey. The queen apparently had the warship of Henry Hussey so far as the administration of the succession to Henry le Fleming was concerned.

Henry Hussey was summoned for military service from December 12, 1276 to June 14, 1287 probably in the service of King Edward I in his invasion of Wales. He was summoned "to serve against the Welsh and will serve in person" July 1, 1277. He was summoned again in 1282, "but being infirm, makes fine." He was summoned to Parliament at Shrewsbury, Shropshire and "attended the king" at Shrewsbury June 18, 1283. On July 16, 1287 he "had a protection on going to Wales on the king's service," according to "Complete Peerage." On May 17 he was constable of Porchester Castle.

It is believed that Henry Hussey was remarried in 1279, wife's name Margaret. On August 3, 1279 there was "a commission touching persons who assaulted Margaret Husee and her men at Figeldean, Wiltshire while they and their possessions were in the king's special protection."

On February 25, 1279-80 the sheriff of Wiltshire was ordered to deliver Henry Hussey from prison, "the King for 100 pounds pardoned his trespass in taking a doe; but this order was vacated, Henry having been charged therewith on justice-roll in Hampshire. On June 4, 1280 Henry Husee was pardoned 50 marks of the 100 pounds for which he was lately amerced for trespass of the forest out of regard for his dear wife, Margaret, and as ordered to pay 100 marks to the Friar Preachers, London, towards the building of their new church." On November 5, 1280 Henry Hussey "had a protection on going beyond seras," according to "Complete Peerage." On October 16, 1288 "Henry Husee was to be acquitted 50 marks of the 100 marks fine by the justices of Hampshire for trespass of the forest, as the King in the 8th year acquitted H nry of 50 marks in consideration of the King's kinswoman, Margaret, Henry's wife."

Apparently Margaret Hussey died in 1279, perhaps as the result of the assault upon her party. Henry Hussey was remarried almost immediately, for the third time, on November 5, 1280, wife's name Agnes. He was "summoned to council at Gloucester" July 15, 1280.

On March 17, 1289 Henry Hussey, as constable of Porchester Castle, was " to have the needful timber for repairs of the houses of the castle and renewal of the King's mill from Porchester Forest." He was ordered to go overseas November 5, 1280. "He and another were ordered to place Missenden Abbey in secure financial position," November 26, 1281. "Having made fine for service in 1282 to King Edward I, he had his scutage [commutation of t he military service due from the holder of a knight's fee] in Sussex, Wiltshire and Berkshire, February 28, 1286," according to "Knights of Edward I ." He went to Wales for the king July 16, 1287.

Henry Hussey died July 23, 1290, "Sunday, the morrow of St. Mary Magdalen, in the 18th year of the reign of King Edward I," according to "Complete Peerage." He held manors of Standen, Berkshire; Sturmore, Denbighshire, Wales; Childestone and Checkeshille, Kent; Tuedworth, Wiltshire and lands in Buckinghamshire, according to "History of Buckinghamshire." It is believed that he also held property in Sussex. An inquisition held July 23, 1305 revealed that Henry Hussey "died seized of Hascombe manor and of the advowson [right to make appointments] of the church of Hascombe, "according to "History of Surrey."

"On an inquisition taken after the death of Henry Husee, it was found that he died on Friday before the feast of St. Peter in Cathedra in the 5th of Edward III, anno 1332, seised jointly with Isabel, his wife, then living, of the manor of Hascombe with the appurtenances, held of Thomas de Brewos and Thomas de Wintershull, by the service of 60s. per annum, worth a bove reprises 26s, which they had with other lands in Godalming of the feoffment of John de Wintershull and others to hold for their lives, remainders to the heirs of Henry; and that Henry Husee was his son and heir, of the age of 30 years and more. 7 Richard II, anno 1384, John Huntercomb was seised of this manor, probably as a trustee; for in 10 Henry IV, anno 1 409, Sir Henry Husee was found to be seised of it, and of the advows on of the church. Nicholas Husee presented to the church in 1463. It appears by the Bishop's Register, in February 1501-02, that Nicholas Husee left two daughters his co-heirs, viz. Catherine, married to Reginald Bray, and Alice Bray, widow."

At Salisbury, Wiltshire in 1298 it was disclosed in an inquisition that Henry Hussey had held Standen Hussey manor from Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, brother of the king, "by the service of one knight's fee which was worth 20 pounds per annum," according to "Hussey Record."

Child of Henry Hussey and Joan Le Fleming is:

i.    Henry Hussey, born 21 Dec 1265; died Feb 1331. He married Isabel Abt. 1290.

 

Henry Hussey, son of Henry Hussey and Joan le Fleming Hussey, was born Dec ember 21, 1265, according to "Complete Peerage." He was shown as a ge 24 at his father's death. The king took his homage, and he had livery of his father's estate August 26, 1290. He was appointed Knight of the Shire in Sussex in 1290, 1298, 1301, 1307 and 1309, according to "Knights of Edward I."

By order of the king dated October 23, 1289 Henry Hussey received a tax rebate. The order read "to acquit Henry, son of Henry le Hosee, the other heir of Henry le Fleming, tenant-in-chief of the late king, of 40s scutage for 5th and 10th years, as the King had learnt from Queen Eleanor, his mother, that Henry was a minor and in her wardship by the late King's grant till December 21, 1286."

Henry Hussey was married about 1290, wife's name Isabel. He was summoned for military service by King Edward I on July 16, 1294 to serve in putting down the rebellion in Gascony and "to attend the king wherever he might be," according to the summons. He continued in this capacity also to King Edward II until October 10, 1325. He was summoned to Parliament June 24, 1295 and continued in that capacity for the next 30 years. He was known as Lord Husse from that date forward.

Henry Hussey was described as "the son of the elder sister of Florence, widow of Walter de Insular [de L'Isle] and co-parencer with her, of Pulburough manor, Sussex" on August 5, 1309. He was ordered "to remain in the North during the winter campaign" in the war against Scotland on August 30, 1315. He was listed as overlord of Knygttone Paynell manor in Wiltshire April 6, 1317. He was appointed sheriff of Surrey and Sussex in 1320. On M arch 5, 1321-22 he was appointed to select 400 footmen from Surrey and Sussex to be brought to Newcastle-on-Tyne Northumberland.

He was ordered "to go to one of his manors near York to defend the North against the Scots" November 27, 1322. He was instructed to "furnish pack saddles in case the army should advance without the waggon train" April 18, 1323. He was summoned as a knight of Gloucestershire and Sussex to the Great Council at Westminster May 9, 1324. He was ordered to military service in Gascony December 21, 1324.

Henry Hussey died in February 1331-32 at age 66 "on Friday before St. Peter in cathedra, leaving widow, Isabel, and son and heir," Henry Husey, who had issue, according to "Knights of Edward I."

At his death, he held in Sussex Harting manor and half of Pulburough manor; in Gloucestershire half of Sapperton manor and Rissington manor; in Berkshire tenements in South Moreton manor and West Wittenham manor; in Buckinghamshire a capital messuage in Missenden manor with the advowson of the abbey jointly owned with Hugh de Plessis; in Wiltshire Standen Hussey manor and one-half of Tidworth manor; in Hampshire rents in Freefolk man or jointly with his wife, Isabel; in Surrey Hascombe manor jointly with his wife, Isabel; in Kent Stourmouth manor which he had ceded to his son, Henry Hussey and his wife.

An inquisition was held at Sapperton, Gloucestershire March 8, 1332 regarding the lands in the county formerly held by Henry Hussey:
"Henry Husse held in his demesne as of fee on the day he died a moeity of Saperton from the king in chief by the service of one-fourth part of a knight's fee. There is there one chief messuage worth nothing bey ond reprises; and 80 acres of arable land worth 29s. per annum, 3d. per acres; and 6 acres of several pasture worth 12d. per annum, 2d per acres; and one acre of meadow worth 18d. per acre; and 10 acres of great wood, the pasture whereof is worth 12d. per annum, and not more because of the shade. There are there four customary tenants, who pay 26s.8d per annum for their works and services at the four principal terms of the year in equal portions. The pleas and perquisites of the court are worth 12d per annum.

"The said Henry also held, as above, a moeity of Rusyndon manor from the King in Chief by the service of one-fourth part of a knight's fee. There is here one messuage with a garden adjacent, worth 3s. per annum; and 1 20 acres of arable land worth 40s, 4d per acre; and 4 pounds rents of assize per annum of free and bond tenants, payable equally at the said terms. The pleas and perquisites of the court are worth 2s. per annum. Total, 7 pounds, 4s. Henry Husse, son of the said Henry is his next heir, and is age 30 and more."   Also on March 8, 1332 an inquisition was held in Wiltshire to inventory his property there. Included was Tudeworth manor "held of the Earl Marshall by knight service" and Standen manor "held of the Earl of Lancaster by the service of one knight's fee." The latter property consisted of a court with a close [land held as private property], a dove cote, 180 acres of arable land, eight acres of meadow a nd 60 acres of wood.

Isabel Hussey received as assignment of dower June 10, 1332 to the property of Henry Hussey. It is believed that she was remarried before January 15, 1336-37 to John Gambone. John Gambone and Isabel Hussey Gambone filed a complaint against her son, Henry Hussey for attempting to dispossess them from their home. The complaint read "that Henry Husee of Harting demised for 17 years to Isabel lands in South Standen, etc, extended at 100 pounds, but the said Henry, his servant and others strove to expel her from the lands, snatched the writing from her servant, stole her goods, etc." Henry was tried for the offense January 1536-37 and fined.

 

*****************************************************

 

Descendants of Leonard Of Pilkington    Top

Generation No. 1

1. Leonard Of Pilkington

Leonard of Pilkington has often been asserted to be the Saxon Thane who held the manor of Pilkington at the time the Normans invaded Englands shores. He also fought under Harold at the Battle of Hastings.

 

 

There certainly was a Saxon lord of Pilkington at that period, but no record can be discovered which supplies that name.

In the History of Lancashire there is mention's the name "Leonard," and for authority cites that very manuscript, which is supposed to be a copy of what was prepared by a professional pedigree-maker for Sir Arthur Filington of Yorkshire when created Baronet in 1635 by King Charles the First; it commences, " Leonard at the Battle of Hastings, Leonard Pilkington, lord of Pilkington Tower, had a command under Harold, on whose defeat at Hastings he fled from the field of battle, and, when hotly pursued, put on the clothes of a mower and so escaped. From this circumstance he took for his crest a mower of parti-colours, gules & argent."

Orign of the name Pilkington:

The name is thought to be pre 1066 Anglo-Saxon, possibly from north Germany (the Holstein region).

Pilk - a proper name in use in Holsteining - the offspring of ton - a dwe lling place, village or town Put together - the dwelling place of the family of Pilk.

The descent of the Pilkington family can be traced from Leonard de Pilkington, Lord of the Manor of Pilkington, who fought under Harold at the Battle of Hastings. After his victory, Norman William divided large tracts of Britain amongst his many followers and the ownership of a vast estate in south-east Lancashire (including the area now occupied by Whitefield) was confined upon Sir Leonard de Pilkington. How he persuaded William I to allow him to keep his manor is unknown.

Having acquired this new and highly desirable property this first Knights et about turning it to some practical use and created a Park which bore his own name. This park included more land than is, at present, covered by Whitefield U.D., and took in considerable tracts from what are now the towns of Radcliffe and Heywood as well as further land, now the Unsworth area of Bury. It was at Stand, the highest point in this Park (the name 'Stand' is derived from a hunting stand, from which the country could be scanned for game), that Sir Leonard built his manorial hall.

At least two of his descendants took part in the Crusades and journeyed to the Holy Land, but this co-operation with the ideas of the Monarchy did not last and, in 1322, Sir Roger de Pilkington was taken prisoner at the Battle of Boroughbridge by the forces of Edward II. He was, however, pardoned, and further Pilkington's (Sir John with his son John) earned their house a return to Royal favour by courageous conduct at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415, fighting under Henry V, and, by contributing, heavily, to the Royal Exchequer. (See next)

One of his descendants, Sir John Pilkington, with his son John and their retainers went to France with Henry V and fought at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415. At Agincourt the retinue of Sir John was John Kay, Roger Kay and William Lee. His men consisted of ten lances and forty-five arche s. In order to pay his troops Henry 'Pledged some of his jewels and plate to the younger John Pilkington. They were not redeemed until 1431.

Some time later the Pilkington family came into possession of the Manor of Bury, after which Bury became the principal residence of the family. Bury Castle was fortified and castellated in the reign or Edward IV. It has been stated that Edward also gave a licence to Sir T-homan Pilkington to kernel and castellate his manor house at Stand, but it is doubted if the work was carried out.

Sir Thomas Pilkington fought for Richarcd III at the Battle of Bosworth Field where Richard was killed and his opponent, Henry Tudor became king. As a result, Henry VII confiscated all Sir Thomas's lands and gave them to Sir Thomas Stanley, whom he created Earl of Derby, The property included land at Nether Kellet, Haleworth, Saimesbury, Pilkington, Bury, Cheethatn, Cheetwood, Haliwell, Undesworth (Unsworth), Salford, Shuttleworth, Middleton, Shippelbotham, Smethills, Tottington, Bolton in Furness, Brought on-in-Furness, Urswick and elsewhere. Sir Thomas's lands were therefore extensive and well-spread.

Harland says that Sir Thomas Pilkington was killed whilst fighting for Lambert Sirnnel at the Battle of Stoke. On the other hand, the Victoria County History of Lanmhire states that he was not killed there and that he was pardoned in 1506; but this seems unlikely as it is stated that his son Roger died in 1501 and that Roger had no son so what was left of his estate was divided between Roger's six daughters. It seems probable that Sir Thomas was at Urswick when he joined Simnel, for Simnel landed at Piel Castle in Furness and rallied his forces on Swarthmoor, which is not f ar from Urswick.

The11th century Stand Hall was family seat of the de Pilkington family who have lived here since before the battle of Hastings. A second Stand Hall was built around the 13th century by the Derby family, who were given the estate after Henry VII confiscated the Pilkington lands, this second hall was demolished in the 1940's. This was due to Sire Thomas Pilkington backing the wrong side at the Battle of Bosworth. This second hall was located to the east of the original hall. In 1515 a third Stand Hall was erected.

The Pilkington Family have their roots were in the Manor of Pilkington, near Whitefield in Bury, and their ancestry goes back to Alexander (sometimes known as Leonard) de Pilkington who fought at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. It was upon his marriage that Whitefield and Underworth (later called Unsworth) became part of the Pilkington Estate. The districts of Stand and Outwood, old parts of Whitefield, remained solely in the hands of the Pilkington family until the fifteenth century when the entire Manor passed to the Derby family - probably forfeited because of the Pilkington family allegiance to the defeated and deposed King Richard III.

 

Robert Pilkington fought and died at the Battle of Agincourt and Sir Thomas Pilkington fought at the Battle of Bosworth and was killed at the Battle of Stoke in 1487.

 

In the early 16th century, James Pilkington, the third son of Richard Pilkington of Rivington Hall, became the first Protestant Bishop of Durham and thereafter the family gained lands all over England. His brother Leonard Pilkington founded a Grammar School in the 1500s at Rivington, near Horwich, with the permission of Queen Elizabeth II.

The Pilkington Family have their roots were in the Manor of Pilkington, near Whitefield in Bury, and their ancestry goes back to Alexander (sometimes known as Leonard) de Pilkington who fought at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. It was upon his marriage that Whitefield and Underworth (later called Unsworth) became part of the Pilkington Estate. The districts of Stand and Outwood, old parts of Whitefield, remained solely in the hands of the Pilkington family until the fifteenth century when the entire Manor passed to the Derby family - probably forfeited because of the Pilkington family allegiance to the defeated and deposed King Richard III.

Nearer to the present day William Windle Pilkington, who was born at Windle Hall, St Helens in Lancashire on 26th September 1839, the eldest son of Richard Pilkington, was to become one of the founders of the famous Pilkington Glass works in St Helens. He was married to Ann Evans, who was the daughter of Richard Evans, proprietor of the Haydock Collieries.

Child of Leonard Of Pilkington is:

 

i.    Leonard Of Pilkington.

 

Generation No. 2

2. Leonard Of Pilkington

According to Burke, (Landed Gentry) Leonard II, Lord of Pilkington, in Lancashire, lived in the 10th. yeare of King Henry the first, married and h ad issue: Robert, Thomas, and John and seven others.

Child of Leonard Of Pilkington is:

i.    Alexande3 De Pilkington, born Abt. 1110; died 1180.

 

Generation No. 3

3. Alexander De Pilkington was born Abt. 1110, and died 1180.

Alexander of Pilkington, was born about 1110, and died 1180 is the first person for whom,according to existing records, can justly claim a pla ce in the pedigree.

In the Lancashire Pipe Rolls of (31 Henry II, 1184-5) it is mentioned that payments were made into the Treasury by " Alexander son of Alexander ," and by " William son of Alexander " No surnames are given, as they were not in use amongst the English earlier than the next generation. Both were of Salford Hundred in which the villiage of Pilkington was located, and they are believed to be the " Alexander de Pilkington and Willia in de Pilkington "

Dr. William Farrer (and there is no higher authority), in his volume of Lancashire Inquests, expresses the opinion that the occurrence of these names in the Pipe Roll perhaps justifies the conjecture that there was an "Alexander, senior, lord of Pilkington, before the " Alexander de Pilkington " who, according to the records, held the manor of Pilkington in the time of King John.

We may thus take it for granted that the above Alexander had three children:

1. Alexander, who assumed "de Pilkington" as a Surname.

2. William de Pilkington, who was party to a Final Concord of 4 John, regarding land in Rivington, along with " Alexander de Pilkinton, described as his " brother," and " Alice his sister.

3. Alice de Pilkington, who was a sister of the above, was a party to the Final Concords, along with her brothers Alexander and Williain de Pilkingion.

Children of Alexander De Pilkington are:

i.    Sir Alexander De Pilkington, died Abt. 1231.

ii.   William De Pilkington.

iii.  Alice De Pilkington.

 

Generation No. 4

4. Sir Alexander De Pilkington; died Abt. 1231. He married Ursula De Workeslegh.

In 1202 Alexander de Pilkington owned Rivington Hall.

Sir Alexander de Pilkington held the manor of Pilkington during the reign of King John, and, judging from the Lancashire Pipe Rolls, of (31 Henry 11) In the Roll entries already referred to, he was in possession as early as the fime of Henry the Second, six oxgangs of land in Rivington were also inherited by him.

He was alive in I I 85, and up to 123 1, or perhaps a little later. It was in this generation that the place-name " de Pilkington " was assumed as the hereditary family Surname.

At the Great Inquest (A.D. 1212) concerning services due to the King, "Alexander de Pilkinton was one of the seventeen trusty Knights who were appointed commissioners, and it was recorded on that occasion that he himself was the holder of land, under Robert Grelly (fifth baron of Manchester), by the service due for the fourth part of a Knight's fee, and by acting as a judge for the King, of "ancient tenure" That land was the manor of Pilkington, as is clear from later Surveys.

That Survey furthermore informs us that, at the same time, Sir Alexander de Pillinton held six oxgangs of lands in Rivington of the King by than age tenure, at the rent due to the King of I Os annually, and that the sons of his mother's brother held that land from him.

In the Great Roll of 4 John (A.D. (1202) records that Alexander de Pilkynton paid into the Exchequer 5s out of half a mark due for six oxgangs of land in Rivington, due under the tallage assessed by Richard de Nialebisse by the King's authority; payments were also made by him in other years.

In 1225, he was a juror on the Roll of Eyre in the matter of Homby Castle and the Montbegon family,

The Pipe Roll of I I Henry III (1226-7), records the receipt of 13 6s. S d. which Alexander had paid on account of twenty-five marks due to the Treasury, for a ftne.

It is conjectured that his wife was Ursula, a daughter of Geoffrey de Workedlegh, but actual proof is wanting.

T'he exact date of. his death is not known ; it would, however, be shortly after 1231 when he witnessed one of the Lord Ellesmere Deeds and prior to 1242, when Sir Roger de Pifldngton beeme possessor of the manor of Pilkington. Alexlnder is supposed to have had three sons:

1. Roger.

2. Robert, styled "Robert son of Aexander de Pilkington in a Quit Claim of 21st Sept 1247 (31 Henry 111) "to the Abbot and Convent of Roche Abbey, Yorkshire, relating to lands in Saddleworth. Knott Hill, near Delph, where Canute is traditionally s aid to have harangued his army, is mentioned in the deed"

     

Children of Sir De Pilkington and Ursula De Workeslegh are:

i.    Robert De Pilkington.

I - Robert, who in 1291 was killed by an arrow shot by Nicholas de Dogwero in Satford, who after the death fled abroad, his chattels being then seized by the authorities.

2- Adarn. In the Crown Pleas of 20 Edward 1. He fell from an Oak in Pilkington and was killed.

3- John. He had a son who is styled " Alexander, son John de Pilkinton in the Patent Roll of 23rd July, (20 Edward 1, 1292); the entry states that " pardon is granted to Alexander de Pilkinton son of John de PiMngton, in Lancaster Gaol, for the death of Adam del Wode (of the wood) because, by the record of Hugh de Cressingham and his " fellows, he killed him in self defence." It is significant that six years later Henry del Wode together with other members of that family were tried for fatally wounding, " Adam, son of Alexander de PiBdnton,"

These several troubles may have arisen out of the granting of Free Warren by the King to Sir Roger de Pilkington, lord of Pilkington.

The Alexander, son of John de Pilkington, above referral to, is said to have had a son Richard, whose name appears in a Dmd wherein he is described as " Richard de Pilkinton son of Alexander de Pilkinton" and as having married Joan the widow of Adwn de Permington, shortly after the death of the latter in 1309.

 

ii.   Sir Roger De Pilkington, born Abt. 1212; died Abt. 1270.

Generation No. 5

5. Sir Roger De Pilkington was born Abt. 1212, and died Abt. 1270. He married Unknown.

Sir Roger de Pilkington was lord of the manor of Pilkington in 1242. It is possible that he was in possession somewhat earlier, for the name of the previous lord (Sir Alexander) is not met with in any discoverab le docunent of a later date than 1231.

He also inherited the six oxgangs of land in Rivington which had been held by his ancestors.

In 1221 he was plaintiff with Geoffrey son of Luke, in the King's Court, against Henry de Bolton, chaplain of Bolton Church and, about the same date, was witness to a charter of Gilbert de Notton.

In 1242-3, at the Inquest ol Knight's Fees for levying the Gascony Soutage, it is clearly shown that he was then the hereditary possessor of Pilkington; that record says "Roger de Pilkinton holds one-fourth of a Knights fee, under the over-lordship of Thomas de Grelly, Baron of Manchester, the King's tenant in chief.

In 1246 he was concerned in suits to recover damages for trespass in Sholver, when verdicts were given in his favour. The date of his death is not definitely known, but it would be about the year 1270, or shortly afterwards.


Child of Sir De Pilkington and Unknown is:

i.    Alexander De Pilkington, born Abt. 1225 in Pilkington, Standish Parish, Lancashire, England; died Abt. 1291 in Pilkington, Standish Parish, Lancashire, England.

 

Generation No. 6

6. Alexander De Pilkington was born Abt. 1225 in Pilkington, Standish Parish, Lancashire, England, and died Abt. 1291 in Pilkington, Standish Parish, Lancashire, England. He married Alice De Chetham Abt. 1254 in Of Rivington, Lancashire, England. She was born Abt. 1230, and died 1274 in Pilkington, Standish Parish, Lancashire, England.<=

Sir Alexander de Pilkington, born about 1225; died about 1291, was the next lord who succeeded to the manor of Pilkington and to the six oxgangs of land in Rivington.

His name is repeatedly met with, as a witness to Lancashire and Cheshire Charters between 1250 and 1270, and in the latter year he and his son Roger were witnesses to certain Lever Charters.

In 1277 (in Trinity Term of 5 Edward 1) he conunenced proceedings against Adam de Prestwich and others for wrongfully throwing down a dyke in Pilkington to the injury of "his tenants" through the depasturing of their corn; the verdict was that the dyke was partly in Prestwich and partly in Pilkington, and that Adam had wrongfully destroyed the part in the latter place, which was to be re-erected at his cost.. From time to time, as shown by the deeds (say between years 1270 and 1290), he added to his Rivington estate, for we find from the deeds that several of the small proprietors transferred their plots to him. These latter included Richard de Gainei sley,

Richard son of Richard de Gatnelsley, Roger son of Richard de Rovington, William son of Richard de Rovington, Ellen and Maud de Rovington, and William de Brodehurst. In the transfers he is styled ' Alexander de Pilkington Dominus de Pilkington," and these acquisitions (with purchases made at a later date by his son, and his grandson) resulted in the Pilkingtoris becoming possessed of seven- eighths of the entire township.

On the 25th April, (10 Edward I, 1282), he was one of the twelve jurors, with Geoffrey de Chadderton, at the Inquisition held after the death of Rob ert Grelly, seventh Baron of Manchester, and it was reported at the enquiry that Sir Alexander de

Pilkington holds the manor of Pilkington for the fourth part of a Knights fee, and does suit" from Court Baron to Court Baron; he furthermore, on the 3rd of May, 1282, was one of the jurors at the Sheriffs "Exten t" of the barony.

Sir Alexander just prior to his death conveyed all he had in Rivington to his second son Richard, on the occasion of the marriage of the latter to Ellen, a daughter of William de Anderton, of Rumworth and Anderton. The deed is undated, but was probably 1290.

He died in or before 1291, as is proved by the fact that his eldest son Sir Roger was then in possession of the manor of Pilkington and was granted Free Warren by the King.

According to the Plea Rolls referred to below his wife was named Alice, and it is believed that she was the daughter of Henry de Chetham, and the sister of Sir Geoffrey de Chetham, lord of the manor of Cheetham and Crompton, who died in 1274.

Alice de Pilkington survived her husband, being described in the Plea Rolls of 1301 and 1309 at "Alice who was the wile of Alexander de Pilkington and in a Plea of Assize of Moit d'ancestor against Adam de Rossendale and MargM his wife, for th recovery of Dower land in Oldham and N4anchester .

 

Sir Alexander had four sons:

1. Sir Roger, the eldest, who succeeded to the lordship and manor of Pilkington,

2. Richard, the second son, to whom, as we have shown, his father gave Rivington.

3. Sir John, the third son, who was born about 1265. He married Margery, a daughter of William de Anderton, of Anderton and Rwnworth, about 1291 .

On 18th June, 1294, he was appointed Attorney for John Lovell, then " going beyond the seas on the King's service" and in 1316, as one of the two members of Parliament for County Lancaster, he received (as did also his brother Sir Roger) his Writ de Expensis for attending before Parliament as a Commissioner for the perambulation of Forests. This Sir John is supposed to have had three sons: (a) John and (b) Thomas, of Salford, who in 1332 paid Lay Subsidy, as ordered,by Parliament. (c) Henry, who held three burgages in Salford in 1323

4. Adam, the fourth "son of Sir Alexander", was of Bolton and Sharples. He married " Matilda" daughter of Elias de Penulbury, lord of Wickleswick and Pendlebury

Children of Alexander De Pilkington and Alice De Chetham are:

i.    Sir Roger De Pilkington, born Abt. 1255 in Pilkington, Standish Parish, Lancashire, England; died 1322 in Pilkington, Standish Parish, Lancashire, England.

ii.   Richard De Pilkington, born Abt. 1260; died in .

iii.  Sir John De Pilkington, born Abt. 1265; died in . He married Margery De Anderton.

iv.  Adam De Pilkington, born Abt. 1268; died in . He married Matilda De Penulbury.

 

Generation No. 7

7. Sir Roger7 De Pilkington was born Abt. 1255 in Pilkington, Standish Parish, Lancashire, England, and died 1322 in Pilkington, Standish Parish, Lancashire, England. He married (1) Alice De Otteby. He married (2) Margery Middleton. He married (3) Amery De Barton, daughter of Sir Gilbert De Barton. She was born Abt. 1260, and died 1295.

Sir Alexander de Pilkington, the eldest son of Sir Alexander I, was born about 1255 and died in 1322.

He succeeded to the lordship of the manors of Pilkington, Cheetham and Crompton in 1291 on the death of his father and in recognition of "the good services rendered" King Edward the First on the 10th June, 1291, granted Free Warren " to him and his heirs for ever," being permission to shoot over his demesne lands of Pilkington, Whitefield, Unsworth, Cheetham, Crompton, Sholver, and Wolstenholme. A year later this right was confirmed to him .

In addition to the inheritance above mentioned, he was overlord of the six oxgangs of land in Rivington, which his ancestors had held. That property, however, was in reality given by his father to Richard the second son and remained a possession of his descendants until finally disposed of in 1611.

By an undated deed, known to be of the year 1291, Roger had a grant from Thomas de Mamcestre of his reversionary interest in land in Sharples, which was held for life by Adam.de Pilkington, Roger's brother.

The Parliamentary Writs style him " Roger de Pilkynton, Knight Bachelor."

He had an eventual career, and we find that by Letters Patent of 25th February, (18 Edward I, I290), the King granted him I 00p, quite a large sum in those days, in consideration of his services in Gascony and "Aspes" and that in 1296 he had Letters of Protection "on going beyond the seas " on the King's service with William de Louth, Bishop of Ely.

On May, 1301, he was one of the nine witnesses who attested the Charter granted, by Thomas de Gresley, the sixth baron, to Manchester. In 1302, he contributed for his manors to the Aid for marrying the King's eldest daughter Eleanor.

On the 9th April 1312, being a time of great political unrest, he settl ed the manors of Pilkington and Cheetham on himself for life, with the proviso that the " remainder " after his dicath should be to Roger his eldest son, and, failing Roger's issue, then to William the brother of Roger, the children by his first wife. In the same year, owing to the increased unpopularity of the King, civil war again broke out, headed by Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, and resulted in the death of the King's detested favourite, Piers Gaveston, whom Edward, contrary to his father's dying wish, had recalled from banishment. Sir Roger being one of who sided with the Earl and the Barons had to seek the Kines pardon, which was granted on the 16th October, 1313. He saw service in Scotland, and his presence at the mgumary and disastrous battle of Bannockburn (which established Robert le Bruce on the throne of Scotland) in 1314. Roger, constantly to the fore in public affairs, was appointed a Supervisor of Array on m any occasions. He was summoned to attend Parliament between the 28th July and the 8th August, 1316, when he and his brother, Sir John (the two Knights chosen for the County) were allowed their " Writ de Expensis," as commissioners in relation to the perambulation of forests. On the 7th August, 1318, he once more was proclaimed for being an adherent of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, but, on the Ist November, along with 453 others, was again pardoned with the consett of Parliament.

Civil war again broke out and in 1322, after the defeat of the Earl of Lancaster and the Barons at the fiercely contested battle of Boroughbridge. Roger was seized, and On the 17th March imprisoned at Tickhill Castle, Co. York. It was expeded that he would be beheaded, but, on the intervention of his friend, Sir Adam de Swillington, one of the King's officers in Yorkshire, his life was spared, and, on the 1lth July 1322, the Lord Chief Justice and Commissioners were directed to release him, subject to his givi ng surety for his good behaviour, by oath and by bond; it was, however, stipulated that he be subjected to a fine of 300 marks (a fine which was never enforced) and be permitted to sue for the redemption of his estates.

It is probable that he had been wounded, for he died shortly afterwards, and by May, 1323, his widow (the third wife) Margery had married Sir Adam de Swillington; Margery and Sir Adam then jointly sued for, and succeeded in recovering the estates seized by the King.

Sir Roger's first wife, it is conjectured, was Amery, one of the three daughters (Agnes, Alice, and Amery) of Sir Gilbert de Barton, lord of Barton; the reason for this assumption is that Roger, who had two sons (Roger and William) by the first wife, became possessed after her death, in 1294- 5, of one-sixth the manor of Barton, as shown by the Final Coneords "by the courtesy of England," a man and his issue became entitled to the inheritance of his deceased wife in the event of there being children by the marriage.

For his second wife, he married Alice daughter of Sir Ralph de Otteby, and on the 6th of April, 1295, her father settled upon them and their issue (" en franc marriage ") the manor of Otteby, county Lincoln. By her he had one child only, named Alexander.

He afterwards married, as his third wife, in or about 1310 (4 Edward 11) The Margery to whom reference has already been made. She was probably a Middleton, as in that year Robertson of Roger de Middleton enfeoffed Roger de Pilkington and Margery his wife of all his lands and tenements in Great Lever, together with certain wastes.

In 1316 Roger and MargM were jointly enfeoffed by " Ralph de Upton, clerk, of one-third the Mill of Reddish with appurtenances, together with other lands and tenements, " to have and to hold, to them and the heirs of their bodies lawfully begotten." This feoffinent was likewise forfeited to the King in 1322 on the occasion of the attainder of Sir Roger, but after his death it was recovered upon petition, and the mill was in possession of Roger's grandson named Roger in 1381. By this third marriage there were two sons, Richard and Adam.

The details relating to the sons by the various marriages:

1. Roger, a son by the first wife.

2. William, a son also by the first wife. He is mentioned (along with h is brother Roger) in the settlement made by his father on the 9th April, 1 312.

In the Patent Roll of the 15th August, (7 Edward 111, 1333), he is styl ed " William brother of Richard," a son by the third wife. On the 7th Augu st, 1344, he was appointed Rector of Swillington by his step-mother, Margery, Sir Roger's third wife" then the wife of Adam de Swillington.

     

Children of Sir De Pilkington and Amery De Barton are:

i.    Willaim De Pilkington.

ii.   Alexander De Pilkington.

iii.  Roger De Pilkington, born Abt. 1291 in Pilkington, Standish Parish, Lancashire, England; died in .

 

Generation No. 8

8. Roger De Pilkington was born Abt. 1291 in Pilkington, Standish Parish, Lancashire, England, and died in . He married Alice De Bury, daughter of Henry De Bury and Margery De Radclyffe. She was born Abt. 1301 in Bury, Lancashire, England, and died 1374.

Sir Roger de Pilkington II was bom about 1291 and died in 1345. he was the eldest son of Sir Roger who succeeded to the lordship of the manors of Pilkington, Cheetham, & Crompton., in 1323. He was also the over-lord of Riviiigton manor.

On the 7th January, IS Edward II (I325) Roger was summoned to perform military service in Guienne, in accordance with instructions from the King, he having rendered himself liable to assist in his foreign wars. It is clear from this that Roger had taken part, along with his father, in the risings of the Barons. The entry in Rot. Vascon includes the names of 180 persons in the County of Lancaster who were so summoned- it sets forth that Sir Roger " heretofore the King's enemy. " had obtained a pardon and restitution of his lands on finding surety to be ready to serve a broad whenever called upon, and was, therefore, commanded to repair to the King at Plymouth on the 17th March [of that year], properly mounted and equipped ready to embark to Guienne in the King's pay". "Furthermore, that he was " to certify before the first week in Lent the manner in which he purposed to be arrayed and equipped, and the nwnber of men he would bring with him".

On the 24th Febnwy, 1340-1, he was one of the jurors on the Inquisition appointed to fix the value of lands in the Wapentake of Salford, for the ninths and fifteenths, granted by Parliament to the King.

Under Privy Seal, King Edward the Third granted him exemption from Knight- service for life on the 16th May, 1341. No reason is assigned for this, but it is probable that he had been wounded in the wars.

He died in 1343, in which year his eldest son, being then under age, was fined for not undertaking Knighthood.

His wife was Alicia, the daughter of Henry de Bury, lord of Bury (her mother being, Margery, the daughter of Richard de Radcliffe, of Radcliffe, who became heiress to her brother, Henry de Bury junior.

On the 8th January, 48 Edward III (1374-5), John of Gaunt, Duke'of Lancaster, Baron of Halton, under his privy seal, appointed "Robert de Pilkington esquire" to succeed Mawkyn [Matthew] de Rixton as his Seneschal of Halton for life, a position which Mr. William Bearnont, in his History of the Castle and Honour of Halton, says was always held by a person of high social station, This high office embraced the Constableship of the Castle, and the Surveyorship of all the parks and Woods in the County of Chester.

Letters of Protection we're again granted to him on the 4th May, (I Richa rd 11, 1378), as one of the retinue of John of Gaunt upon the sea, and the rein he is described as " Robertus de Pilkyngton, armiger, Senescallus dom inii de Halton in Comitatu Cestrix.

On the 6th February, 1383, and on the 7th January, 1386, similarly express ed letters were issued to him, whilst accompanying John of Gaunt to Spa in and protection was also afforded to John del Wode, servant of " Robertus de Pilkington de Pilkyngton."

Robert was furthermore granted protection, on the 16th January, 1393, as one of the retinue of John de Holand, Earl of Huntington, Captain of Brest. ""

According to the Gaol Delivery Rolls, on the 15th July, 1392, Thurstan Anderton, and others, were charged with having broken into the house of Robert Pilkynton at Colton, Co. Stafford, and stolen sixteen arrows, and with wishing to kill him; verdict, not guilty.

On the 22nd March, 1398, by grant of Richard 11, "Robert de Piflcymton esquire " and several others were allowed ten marks annually out of the issues of Nottingham, " because retained to stay with the King for life."

3. Henry, the third son; described as "Henry son of Sir Roger in a suit of 1356, regarding lands in Hghfield, Famworth. On the 25th November, 1 374, he and his brothers, Robert and Richard were granted Letters of Protection for one year, under Privy Seal, whilst accompanying Sir Edward le Despenser beyond the seas. Henry had two sons:

(a) John de Pilkington, who from 1367 until his death in 1406 as Rector of Bury on the presentation of Sir Roger de Pilkington. Ms successor was instituted 28th August, 1406. In 1399 he was made plaintiff in the Final Concord as to the manor of Stagenhoe, on a settlement being arranged by Sir John de Pilkington and his wife.

(b) Richard, who is mentioned in various deeds as " Richard son of Henry.

4. Richard, fourth son of Sir Roger. He became Rector of Prestwich in 1361 on the nomination of Richard de Radcliffe and held the benefice until his death in 1400. In 1368, Richard, " parson of Prestwich," retivuished his interest in lands, sold by Henry his brother, to John de Lever.

Sir Roger de Pilkington's three daughters were:

5. JANE, who became the wife of John del More, of Liverpool

6. Margaret, who married Sir John, son of Sir Thomas de Ardem.

7. Isabell, who married Nicholas de Prestwick.

After the death of her mother, and her brother, she inherited the manor and lordship of Bury, by virtue of the settlement of- 1313, and so enriched the Pilkingtons of this branch.

Edward Baines in his History of Lancashire claims that this Bury was one of the twelve ancient baronial castles of the County. Following the Norman Conquest, Bury had become part of the Montbegon barony and the manor was held by Adam de Bury for'one knight's fee'. Early in the 14th. century his descendant Alice de Bury married Sir Roger de Pilkington and their son Roger inherited the manors of both Bury and Pilkington.

In 1469 Sit Thomas Pilkington was given Royal consent to 'build to make and to construct walls and turrets with stone, lime and sand around and below his manor house in Bury in the County of Lancaster, and to shut in the manor house Ivith such manner of walls and turrets; also to embattle, crenellate and machiolate those towers .......

The Pilkingtons generally supported the Yorkists. At the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485 Sir Thomas fought on the side of Richard III against the Earl of Richmond. But Richard was defeated and the Earl was crowned Henry W. In consequence Pilkington had his lands confiscated and his manors of Bury and Pilkington were given to Thomas Stanley, who was created Earl of Derby.

About the year 1374, Alicia died intestate, and, according to the Treaty Rolls, her eldest son Sir Roger was appointed Adrninistrator of her estate.

The issue by the marriage with Alicia de Bury comprised four sons and thr ee daughters:

1. Roger.

2. Robert, the second son, who was born in 1329, and the date of whose death was not earlier than 1399. Being the son of a Knight, we find him generally described " esquire." His name is frequently met within the public r ecords, which disclose the fact that he was a keen soldier who saw much active service, and ultimately became a trusted public official.

It is probable that he never married, as no allusion to any of his descendants has been found. 

In 1372, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, &c., being about to cross the sea in the retinue of King Edward the Third, ordered John Boteler, Sheriff of Lancashire, Matthew de Rixton, Seneschal of 14 alton, " Robert de Pil kyngton esquire," and others, to meet him with a contingent of archers varying from ten to twenty in each case; and, on the 18th July, 1372, warrants were issued for payment in advance of a month's wages for the selected men. -

On the 25th November, (48 Edward III 1374), the King granted Letters of Protection under Privy Seal for one year, to "Robert son of Sir Roger de Pilkyngton, Richard de Pikngton, parson of Prestwich, and Henry de Pilkyngton ," whilst accompanying Sir Edward le Despenw beyond the seas.

     

Children of Roger De Pilkington and Alice De Bury are:

i.    Margaret De Pilkington.

ii.   Richard De Pilkington.

iii.  Henry De Pilkington.

iv.  Isabell De Pilkington.

v.   Robert De Pilkington.

vi.  Jane De Pilkington.

vii. Roger De Pilkington Lll, born Abt. 1325 in Of Pilkington, Lancashire, England; died 02 Jan 1406 in Pilkington Manor, Lancashire, England.

 

Generation No. 9

9. Roger De Pilkington III was born Abt. 1325 in Of Pilkington, Lancashire, England, and died 02 Jan 1406 in Pilkington Manor, Lancashire, England. He married Unkown.

Sir Roger de Plikington, the, eldest son of Sir Roger, and Alicia de Bury his wife was born about 1325. He died on the 2nd January 1406.

According to the Pipe Rolls'of Edward the Third, he was fined 4os. when under age in 1343, and again in 1345, for not undertaking Knighthood.

On the death of his father in 1343, he became lord of Pilkington, Cheetha m, Crompton and in 1375, on the decease of his mother, he succeeded to the manor and lordship of Bury, together with the right of presentation to Bury Church.

In 1346 he contributed to the Aid for Knighting the King's eldest son, a subsidy which was not collected until 1355.

He was appointed on the Commission of the Peace for County Lancaster in 1350. On the 3rd July, 1354, he received Letters of Protection whilst on an expedition with John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, to France, and was granted a licence for Attorneys to act on his behalf in all Pleas, &C., during that absence.

Sir Roger was in high favour during the reigns of Kings Edward the Third and Richard the Second, and the Close Rolls show that he was six times returned Knight of the hire, as one of the two representatives in. Parliament for County Lancaster, viz. in 1363, 1364-5, 1368, 1376-7, 1382 and 138 4. On the 1st June, 1383, a precept was granted to Sir Roger de Pilkington, aind Robert de Clifton, for the payment of 10p, the expenses to the Parliament at Westminster, as Knights elected for the Duchy Commonalty."'

In 1369, he and four others were appointed Commissioners of Array, for the County of Lancaster, to press and enroll 400 archers to accompany J hn of Gaunt to'Aquitaine.

On the 20th February, 1382-3, Sir Roger and three others were appointed Commissioners of Array against the Scots for Salforcl Hundred. On the isth March, 1383-4, he was appointed on the Commission of the Peace for Salford.

At the great heraldic controversy, " Scrope v. Grosvenor," He was one of the four Pilkingtons who were summoned to give evidence before the Court of Chivalry.

On the 13th June, 1386 (9 Richard 11), he received a grant of Protection, with clause Volumus, on going to Ireland in company with Sir John de Stanley, on the King's service.

The date of his death was the 2nd January, 1406 (9 Henry IV), as stated at the Inquisition post mortem taken 11 th August, 1407.

 

He left issue, one son and two daughters:

1. Sir John, his son and heir.

2. Isabel, who married Thomas de Lathom, son of Sir Thomas de Lathom, who died at Knowsley in 1382. They had and only daughter, who died young. Isabel afterwards married Sir John de Dalton.

3. Lora, who, in 1398, married Laurence de Standish, of Standish, a son of Ralph de Standish and Cecilia, daughter of Roger de Bradshagh.

 

More About Roger De Pilkington Lll:

Record Change: 29 Mar 2009

More About Unkown:

Record Change: 29 Mar 2009

     

Children of Roger III and Unkown are:

i.    Isabel Pilkington, born 1334 in Knowsley, Lancashire, England; died 20 Oct 1414.

ii.   Sir John Pilkington, born 1342; died 16 Feb 1421. He married Margaret De Verdon; born Abt. 1351; died in .

Sir John de Pilkington, the son and heir of Sir Roger was born about 1343 -4 (37 Edward III) and died 16th February, 1420-21 (8 Henry V), as sho wn by the Inquisition post mortem, taken at Lancaster, 24th April 1421.

iii.  Lora Pilkington, born 1348 in Pilkington Manor, Lancashire, England; died 1432. She married Lawrence De Standish.

 

Generation No. 10

10. Isabel Pilkington was born 1334 in Knowsley, Lancashire, England, and died 20 Oct 1414. She married (1) Sir John Dalton II, son of Sir Dalton and Ellen Hussy. He was born Abt. 1335 in Of Bispham, Lancashire, England, and died 1407. She married (2) Sir Thomas Mathias De Lathom Abt. 1363 in Knowsleys, Lancashire Co. England, son of Thomas Lathom and Eleanor Ferrers. He was born 1324 in Knowsleys, Lancashire Co. England, and died 20 Mar 1381. She married (3) Sir John Stanley 1385.

The Pilkingtons were lords of Bury and Pilkington (hence the de Pilkington in the older records) The family started at Pilkington, by marriage att ained the lordship of Bury, and later, by marriage, got the lands at Rivington (all these sites are basically north of current Bolton, England)

In the 1400's they gave the major lands to the first son at Bury and Pilkington, a younger son got the lands and lordship of Rivington, while another generation saw a Pilkington heir receiving lands in Yorkshire.

The Rivington branch brought forth the first Protestant Bishop of North England, Sir James Pilkington, Bishop of Durham, who advised Queen Elizabeth I. The Pilkington estates in Pilkington, and the "castle" a fortified manor house estate at Bury, were destroyed and seized after the English Civil War, because the Pilkington's supported the "wrong side."

The Pilkington's of Rivington continued in their possession of their holdings, perhaps because they were Protestant, or because their land was le ss valuable.


FILE - date: 8 Henry IV September 4

Grant for grantor's life: Isabel, widow of John de Dalton of the Hughtom. Elyson of same: land (etc) in le Hugh', Caldstrother, Slalee, Duxfeld, Hedlee, Wylom, Acome, Ovyngton, South Dyssyngton, now her dower, also Qwarnle-over-in-Tyn-dale; annual rent, 5 gold marks, at Whitsun and St. Martin in winter: in event of destruction by Scots, or hindrance by ot er of the King's subjects, an allowance to be paid to Wm. as decid ed by 4 honest men chosen by both parties: warranty and sealing clauses.

More About Isabel Pilkington:

Record Change: 29 Mar 2009

Notes for Sir John Dalton II:

Sir John Dalton 2nd, who bore arms as a Knight Bannaret.

Joan daughter of Hugh Venables married Sir Thomas de Lathom who inherited the family lands in 1370 and died in early 1382. They had a son Thomas who died in 1383, leaving a widow Isabel who subsequently married Sir John de Dalton. Isabel and Sir John were related within the fourth degree, and because they knew this when they married they were excommunicated. They separated and were given a licence to remarry and a papal dispensation in 1391. The dispensation declared that their children would be legitimate.


1385 - Sir John's heir John, later a knight, was pardoned for marrying Isabel daughter of Roger de Pilkington without licence of the Duke of Lancaster. He left two sons: the elder, Richard, married Katherine and their daughter & heir Alice married William Griffith in or before 1448. John's younger son Robert recovered some lands in Bispham but failed in a claim for the main manor. Robert's son Richard married Elizabeth daughter & coheir of William Fleming of Croston and was followed by his son Roger (who in 1492 made a feoffment of his lands) and grandson William I: a grant of 1500 to William gave the remainder to William's brother Richard. (ad ded 2/16/02)

Source: Calendar of the Fine Rolls, Henry IV, 1405-1413, pub HMSO 1933:


8 Feb 1406, Westminster. Order to the escheator of the county of Northampton to take into the king’s hand and keep safely all the lands in his bailiwick whereof John de Dalton ‘chivalier’, who held of the king in chief, was seized in her demesne on the day of his death; and to make inquisition touching his lands and heir.

Source: Calendar of the Fine Rolls, Henry V, 1413-1422, pub. HMSO 1934.


6 Dec 1413, Westminster. Appointment during pleasure of John Dalton as receiver general of all lordships, manors and lands which pertain to the king’s principality of Wales (the duchy of Cornwall with its members only excepted), answering to the Exchequer for the moneys of the said principality thus to be received by him, and taking in that office the customary fees, rewards and wages.


10 June 1414, Westminster. Order to the escheator in the county of Northampton to take into the king’s hand and keep safely until further order all the lands in his bailiwick whereof Isabel late the wife of John de Dalton ‘chivaler’, who held of the king in chief, was seized in her demesne as of fee on the day of her death; and to make inquisition touching her lands and heir.


26 Nov 1417, Westminster. John Dalton and Richard Lyversegge stood mainprise for Nicholas Sutton in relation to a cottage in Esthattele which had been seized by the king following the outlawry of Simon Bone, chaplain.

Source: Calendar of the Fine Rolls, Henry VI, 1437-1445, pub HMSO 1937.

8 Feb 1438, Westminster. Order to the escheator in the county of Northampton; - pursuant to an inquisition taken before him showin that Jon Dalton ‘chivaler’ was seized in his demesne as of fee of 39l. 19s. of rent of Apth orp, and held that rent of Henry IV in chief; and that the said John being sos eized of the said rent, a fine was levied in thye king’s court at Westminster, 3 Henry IV, before William Thirnyng, William Rykhill, John Markham, William Hankeford and William Brenchesle, justices, and others the said king’s lieges, between Roger Thomlynson of Byspeham and William de Grenehirst, querents, and the said John Dalton and Isabel his wife, deforciants, touching the said rent, whereof a plea of covenant was summoned between them in the same court, to wit, that the said John acknowledged the said rent to eb the right of the said Roger and William as that which the said Roger and William had of the gift of the said John, and for that acknow ledgement, fine and concord the said Roger and William granted the said rent to the said John and Isabel and rendered it to them in the same court, to hold the same to the said John and Isabel for life, of the said late king and his heirs by the services due and customary, with remainder to Roger Dalton (now deceased), by name of Roger son of the said John and Isabel, for life, and remainder over to the hairs of the bodies of the said John and Isabel for ever; and that the said John and Isabel are dead; and that Richard Dalton is the son and next heir of the said John and Isabel, and of full age; - to cause the said Richard to have full seis in of the said rent, (which has been taken into the king’s hand by the death of the said Roger), as the king has taken his fealty and for 20s. paid in the hanaper has respited his homage until Midsummer next. 


Knowsley Estate Origins and History:

It is said that Sir John Dalton Jr. was of Knowsley. In other words he was probably not born there but may of been an owner of some land there. His grandfather was married to Mary de Latham, whos family once owned the Manor of Knowsley.

Knowsley was held by the Lathom family since the twelfth century. In 1385, with the marriage of Isabel de Lathom to Sir John de Stanley the lands passed to the Stanley family who still hold it today. Sir John Stanley was made Lord Deputy of Ireland by Richard II and went on to hold a number of distinguished positions including Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Treasurer of the Royal Household and Lord of the Isle of Man. His grandson Thomas also became Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, and in 1456 was summoned to Parliament as Lord Stanley. The second Lord Stanley (another Thomas) was knighted in 1460 and was created the First Earl of Derby by a grateful King Henry VII after his intervention proved decisive in the Battle of Boswor thin 1485. Although Lathom House, near Ormskirk, was the chief seat of the family

(until it's destruction in the Civil War), the first Earl must have kept a great house at Knowsley. He built the 'Royal Lodging' in 1495 in honour of Henry VII's visit. In the late sixteenth century it had 118 servants including two trumpeters and a Fool named Henry. By the mid 17th century, the Hall was a huddle of buildings of various dates, materials and uses that ran along the north-south line of the site of the present building. Beyond the Royal Lodging were the kitchens and various court offices, to the east was the chapel with the stables to the north.

In the pleas held at Lancaster Castle before the King's justices on August 29th, 1401, Sir John de Dalton was summoned to answer Robert de Urswyk on a plea that he pay over 100 pounds , which was under a bond dated at Rawcliffe in 1384, to have been paid in Preston in 1385. When the bond was produced in court John refused to acknowledge the writing his and put himself in patria and Urswyk did the same.

Dalton then protested that John Botiller of Rawcliffe, the sheriff and John Laurence and William de Pemberton, two of the kings coroners, were kinsmen of the plaintiff and demanded that they should not meddle with the arraying of the panel but that it committed to the third coroner. The case is resumed in the following February when Dalton's attorney produced royal letters of protection inhibiting his lands and rents from molestation seeing that he was staying in the retinue of Henry Percy warden of Berwick-on-Tweed in the King's obedirnce. it was finally granted that the suit remain sine die.

Source: Copied from the book; "Knights of the Shire of the County Palati ne of Lancaster"

 

BISPHAM

FILE - DDHE 5/1 - date: 11 Apr. 1381

Letter of Attorney: John of Horneby, parson of Tatham, and William son of Robert of Horneby, to Richard of Longlegh -- manor of Byspham, and lands there and in Dalton and Hale -- to take seizin from John son and heir of John of Dalton. Given at Byspham, Thurs. before Easter, 4 Ric. II. Heraldic Seal.

 

CROSTON

FILE - DDHE 11/24 - date: (1 Jul. 1401.)

Quitclaim: Henry Lee to Henry son of John Wryght of Rufforde -- properties in Croston had from Henry Waterwarde, chaplain, and John Pawson of Croston who had them from Cicily wife of H.L. -- Witn: Sir Thomas Flemmyng, Sir John of Dalton, William of Croston. Given at Croston Fri. after St. John Bap., 2 Hen. IV.

     

Children of Isabel Pilkington and Sir Dalton are:

i.    Sir Rychard Dalton, born in Of Apethorp, Northamptonshire, England; died 1442.

ii.   Roger Dalton.

iii.  Sir John Dalton.

iv.  Sir Robert Dalton, born 1386 in Of Byspham, Lancsahire, England; died Aft. 1445 in Of Byspham, Lancsahire, England.

 

**********************************************************

 

Margaret Holker    Top

Generation No. 1

1. Margaret Holker was born 1409 in Cartmel Parish, Lancashire, England, and died in . She married Sir Robert Dalton 1444 in Bispham, Lancashire, England, son of Sir Dalton and Isabel Pilkington. He was born 1386 in Of Byspham, Lancsahire, England, and died Aft. 1445 in Of Byspham, Lancsahire, England.

Margaret Holker may been from the family that Holker Hall is named after. There is a Upper & Lower Holker township in Cartmel Parish in Lancashire. The Preston Family owned this Hall for many years. It was passed on by marrige to the Lowther family and then to the Cavendish Family.

Notes for Sir Thomas Preston of the Prestion family mentioned above:

Sixty-one years after the Norman Conquest, the religious establishment at Tulketh Castle was moved to Dalton and took the name of the district, Furness Abbey.

The estate of Holker originally belonged to the Cartmel Priory and Furness Abbey.

There is Holker Hall still in use today about 10 miles North of the ruins of Furness Abbey. During the Dissolution of the Monasteries the land was granted to the Preston family of Lancashire.

The Abbey was purchased from the Crown by Sir Thomas Preston along with other estates. During Sir Thomas Preston's administration of the estates of Preston Patrick and Under Levins Hall of Westmoreland, were added the valuable properties of Furness Abbey and Holker Park of Lancashire. It was during the time of the suppression of the monasteries by King Henry VIII that the purchase from the trustees of the Crown of the site of the Abbey of Furness, with other large estates amounting in value to more than 3000 pounds a year was made.

More About Margaret Holker:

Record Change: 29 Mar 2009

Notes for Sir Robert Dalton:

Bispham:

The quiet small hamlet of Bispham lies in the eastern section of the West Lancashire district and is only a few miles from both Wigan and Chorley. Sited on the slopes of the Parbold Hills above the Douglas Valley, Bispham Green is the focal point of the parish from where a number of winding lanes radiate around the beautiful countryside - ideal for walking and exploring. The Eagle and Child pub gained its name from Sir Thomas Latham (one of the Earls of Derby - the Stanley's) who in the 14th century had an illegitimate son, he is said to have place the child under a tree in which an eagle nested, and later whilst out walking with his wife 'found' the child convincing his wife to adopt the child. The area was first mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as 'Biscophan' meaning 'The Bishops Estate' being derived from the Old English words ' Biscop & ham'.

VICTORIA COUNTY HISTORIES of LANCASHIRE:

Vol. 3 page 151 - 1347

In 1472 Robert Dalton of Bispham and his son & heir apparent Richard leased their Halewood lands to Robert Lathom of Allerton for 39 years at a rent of 40s

SETTLEMENTS, MORTGAGES, AND DOCUMENTS RELATING TO SEVERAL PROPERTIES

FILE - DDHE 60/16 - date: 1 May 1472

Letter of Attorney: William Lithirlond, rector of Aghton, and William Bradshagh, to Thomas Bradshagh of Lithirlond -- to receive from Robert Dalton, esq. lands in Croston, Maudysley, Byspham, Dalton, and Halewode, as in DDHE 60/15.

More About Sir Robert Dalton:

Record Change: 29 Mar 2009

     

Children of Margaret Holker and Sir Dalton are:

i.    John Dalton, died 10 Sep 1458 in Kingston-Upon-Hull, Yorkshire, England. He married Joan.

The following is a document stored in the Public Records Office, Kew England. Under the title: Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office. Early proceedings, Richard ll to Phillip and Mary.

"John Dalton, of Kingston upon Hull, son of Robert Dalton. v. Thomas Cooke and William Morcell, executors of the said Robert.: Detention of dee ds relating to messuages and gardens in Beverley, York".

 

This proves that there is in fact a link from the Lancashire Dalton's to the Yorkshire Dalton's.

 

The family of DALTON is proved by Dugdale's Visitation (1666) to have be en settled at Kingston-upon-Hull many years prior to going into Richmondshire. The Yorkshire Dalton family were well established in Kingston-upon-Hu ll by the middle of the fifteenth century.

 

The family were merchants of the staple (the staplers traded in wool and h ad their chief office at Calais) and must have been both prominent and prosperous, for, as early as 1487, John Dalton was elected Mayor. The city had been founded in the reign of Edward I and the first mayor was appointed in 1332.

 

********************************************

 

Descendants of Michael Le Fleming    Top

Generation No. 1

1. Michael Le Fleming was born Abt. 1095 in Caernaevon Castle, Cumberland, England, and died Abt. 1150 in Aldingham, Furness, Lancashire, England. He married Miss De Stuteville.

     

Child of Michael Le Fleming and Miss De Stuteville is:

i.    Sir Michael Le Fleming, born Abt. 1146 in Aldingham, Furness, Lancashire, England; died 1186 in Aldingham, Furness, Lancashire, England. He married Christian De Stainton.

 Michael was a landowner in Cumberland, holding part of the manor of Drigg in Coupland, 1125, and Lord of Aldingham in Furness, co. Lancaster, 1127.

 

The Fleming name had it’s origin from a region of either Belgium or Northern France then referred to as Flanders. Those who lived in this area spoke Flemish. The name Fleming refers to one who is a native of Flanders. The Flemish and Dutch language probably derived from one another. It is said that Robert Fleming and his wife spoke with a Dutch accent. Variation of the Fleming name are numerous: Flemming le Fleming, Flemings, Flemon, Fliming, Fleman, Flemans, Fleminge and Flemyng. Somewhere through the years “Fleming” has evolved from these variations.


Elizabeth Fleming is probably descending from the Michael le Fleming II family that were the first holders of the moiety of Furness and was L rd of Aldingham in Furness, 1127, and Lord of Urswick. He held Bolton manor, 1127, which he gave to his daughter Godith, whose descendants in the Copeland family inherited it. Furthermore he held the manors of Bechermet, Frissington, Waddington, Rottingham, Waddicker, and Arlocdon. But his main property consisted of the manors of Aldingham and Urswick.

 

More about the le Fleming family:

The Fleming family derived its descent from Sir Michael le Fleming I, born in Caernarvon Castle, Beckermet (Wales) and who accompanied his kinsman, Baldwin, Earl of Flanders, brother-in-law, of William of Normandy, to assist in the conquest of England in 1066 A. D. Sir Michael le Fleming's second son, Sir Richard le Fleming, was the grandfather of Richard le Fleming, who by marriage with Elizabeth Urswick, became possessed of Coniston Hall, and was the ancestor of Sir Daniel Fleming, of Coniston Hall and Rydal, who in the latter part of the seventeenth century made a pedigree of the Gilpin family, before referred to, the manuscript of which yet remains among the collections of S. H. Fleming, Esq., at Rydal Hall, in the English Lake District.

The manor of Arlecdon is included in the Fee of Beckermet, which is its lf a Fee of the lordship of Egremont. After the subjugation of the Cumbrian kingdom by William the Conqueror in 1072, he conferred the district up on his faithful friend and follower, William de Meschines, and that nobleman granted Arlecdon, together with Fizington, Rotington, Weddicar, and ot er places, to Michael le Fleming, Knt., a kinsman of baldwin, Earl of Flanders, and brother-in-kaw of the Conquror. From this Sir Micael are descended the Flemings of Rydal, in which family it still remains.

William le Fleming, Lord of Aldingham, an ancient Saxon Manor in Furness, and who, in 1273, acquired the Lordship of Aldingham, which had come in to his hands in right of his wife on the death of her two brothers, John and William Cancefield, both of whom died in their minority and while under ward of the Abbot of Furness. The Flemings, from whom these Lancashire estates were inherited, had been in possession of Aldingham almost from the time of the Conqueror. One of them, Michael Flandreusis, or le

Fleming, a military adventurer who came to England out of Flanders, is said to have been in the retinue of Duke William of Normandy, and to have taken part in the struggle on the red field of Senlac and was rewarded by William the Conqueror with a grant of the Manor of Aldingham, of which the Saxon Thane, or Thegn, Ernulf, had previously dispossessed. He was living in 1126 when Stephen of Blois and Boulogne, afterwards King of England, founded the Abbey of Furness, and his lands were exempted from the privileges granted the Abbot of Furness.

 

1. Michael le Fleming had three sons, William, who inherited Aldingham, Richard, who married Elizabeth Urswick, and Daniel.

2. William, eldest son of Michael le Fleming, married Alice, daughter of Thomas, son of Gospatric of Galloway. His son Michael and daughter Alice.

3. Michael le Fleming died young, about 1269, leaving a widow, Alina, and the Manor of Aldingham passed to Alice, sister of Michael, who conveyed it in marriage to Sir Richard Cancefield.

 

Note: The village of Aldingham Is bounded on the east by Morecambe bay; on the south west by the parish of Dalton; and on the north-west by that of Urswick. It is five miles in length, and three and a half in breath. It is divided into the four townships of Aldingham Lower and Upper, Gleaston, and Leece. The entire parish is included in the manor of Muchland, originally called Michael-land, from Sir Michael le Fleming, who received a grant of the demesne of this manor from the Conqueror. In process of time the name Michael was changed into the Scotch epithet Mickle, which signifies much, and the lands were finally corrupted into the appellation of Much-land. This also includes part of the parish of Urswick, called Much-Urswick. A court leet and baron, which were granted in 1199, by King John to William le Fleming and his heirs, are still held in this man or twice a year, at the court room at Seawood.

Note: Gleaston Castle's history began in the mid 13th century when the le Fleming family moved to the valley from nearby Aldingham which had been their seat of residence since 1066. Here they built a manor house, probably close to the centre of the existing castle yard. It is likely that it consisted of a wooden hall with an enclosure for cattle on the south side.

 

The le Flemings:

After the Norman Conquest in 1066 the small manor of Aldingham was granted to Robert de Poitou as part of a much larger holding which included land across much of the north of England. At that time the area was on the very fringe of Norman England. When the Domesday Book was compiled in 1086 Aldingham had been confiscated from de Poitou for his part in a plot against William I, but it was returned to him shortly after. By 1102 Aldingham had been confiscated from de Poitou once again, but before this he had built a ringwork near the coast at Aldingham.

Around 1107 Aldingham was granted to Michael le Fleming (or le Flanderensis) and it was he who gave his name to the manor. At this point the manor stretched from Walney Channel around Rampside and Roose north to Sunbrick and Great Urswick. It was Michael or one of his sons that erected the motte at Aldingham on the site of Roger de Poitou's ringwork.

In 1153, the second Michael le Fleming agreed an exchange of land with Furness Abbey, giving up Roose, Fordbootle and Crivelton for Little Urswick and part of Foss, near Bootle in Cumberland, so that the Abbot could get greater access to his port at Piel.

By the early 13th century the wealth and importance of the manor had increased significantly and the Lord of the manor was granted the right to hold his own courts Leet and Baron. The manor of Bardsea was also added to the le Fleming estate. Around this time the seat of the manor of Muchland was moved from the motte at Aldingham to a nearby moated site, probably due to the advance of the sea and the erosion of the hill on which the motte stands.

In 1227 the overlordship of Muchland was changed from the Duke of Lancaster to Furness Abbey. This seems to have been an unwelcome decision for the Lords of Aldingham, as the Abbot began claiming rights to lands within the bounds of Muchland. Over coming years, the William le Fleming (aka de Furness) got into several disputes over hunting rights with his neighbour the Abbot of Furness which eventually resulted in William being exempt from formal attendance at the Abbots Court and the men of Muchland being banned from entering the Abbot's town of Dalton-in-Furness.

     

Child of Michael Le Fleming and Miss De Stuteville is:

 

i.    Sir Michael Le Fleming, born Abt. 1146 in Aldingham, Furness, Lancashire, England; died 1186 in Aldingham, Furness, Lancashire, England.

 

Generation No. 2

2. Sir Michael Le Fleming was born Abt. 1146 in Aldingham, Furness, Lancashire, England, and died 1186 in Aldingham, Furness, Lancashire, England. He married Christian De Stainton.

Michael was a landowner in Cumberland, holding part of the manor of Drigg in Coupland, 1125, and Lord of Aldingham in Furness, co. Lancaster, 1127.

     

Children of Sir Le Fleming and Christian De Stainton are:

i.    Anselm Le Fleming.

ii.   William Le Fleming, born Abt. 1170; died 1203.

 

Generation No. 3

3. William Le Fleming was born Abt. 1170, and died 1203. He married Ada. She was born in Of Workington.

 

Child of William Le Fleming and Ada is:

i.    Sir Michael Le Fleming, born 1197 in Aldington, Lancashire, England.

 

Generation No. 4

4. Sir Michael Le Fleming was born 1197 in Aldington, Lancashire, England. He married Agatha Fitzhervey. She was born in Of Ravensworth.

William was Lord of Aldingham and Gleaston Castle in Furness. Through his mother he was descended from Alfred the Great and Charlemagne, and through his father he had two lines of descent from the barons of Kendal. He held among many others, the manor of Turnham, which remained in his family from 1200 to 1554. He was a witness to a Boivill charter to the monks of Furness with his brothers Daniel and Jordan.

     

Child of Sir Le Fleming and Agatha Fitzhervey is:

i.    William Le Fleming, born Abt. 1219 in Aldington, Lancashire, England; died in

 

Generation No. 5

5. William Le Fleming was born Abt. 1219 in Aldington, Lancashire, England, and died in . He married Eleanor.

 

Child of William Le Fleming and Eleanor is:

i.    John Le Fleming, born Abt. 1245.

 

Generation No. 6

6. John Le Fleming was born Abt. 1245.          

The said Sir John le Fleming, died in the reign of King. Hen. III. and was buried in the Abbey at Calder, near his Castle of Caernarvon, in Cumberland, to which Abbey he had been a considerable benefactor, and where is yet to been a statue, in free- stone, of a man in armour, (placed there, as is supposed, in memory of him,) with a fret of fix pieces upon his shield, lying upon his back, with his sword by his fide, his hands elevated in a praying posture, and his legs across, which probably are placed, from his taking upon him the crofs, and being engaged in the holy war. For all the worthy men of the nobility and gentry of England, who, in the reigns of King Henry II. Richard I. Hen- III, and Ed. I. were Cruet fignati as dedicating and lifting themselves to the wars, for the recovery of Jerusalem, and the Holy Land, were dignified under this word, Croifcs, as well as Pilgrims, from their wearing the sign of the crofs upon their garments; and as the knights of St. John of Jerusalem, created for the defense of pilgrims.

 

Another story about John le Fleming:
The statue of an armed knight with a fret upon his shield, hands elevated in a praying posture, sword by his side, and legs across, may be seen in Furness Abbey, Lancashire, England, an ancient burial place of the Fleming family. It was placed there generations ago in memory of Sir John Le Fleming, a Crusader. One branch of the Flemings still bears a shield charged with a fret—a heraldic composition of the cross and Norman mascle indicating that the family had a founder, one or more, in the holy wars. The surname of this illustrious family, according to the sentiments of the most approved historians and antiquarians, was at first assumed from a person of distinction, who in the days of King David I. (1124), a Fleming, by nation, transplanted himself into Scotland and took the surname Flander- ensis, or Le Fleming, from the country of his origin.

     

Child of John Le Fleming is:

i.    Sir Richard Le Fleming, born Abt. 1270

 

Generation No. 7

7. Sir Richard Le Fleming was born Abt. 1270, and died in . He married Elizabeth De Urswick.

 

Child of Sir Le Fleming and Elizabeth De Urswick is:

i.    John Le Fleming, born Abt. 1300.

 

Generation No. 8

8. John Le Fleming was born Abt. 1300.

 

Child of John Le Fleming is:

i.    Sir Thomas Fleming, born Abt. 1325.

 

Generation No. 9

9. Sir Thomas Fleming was born Abt. 1325. He married Mrs. Fleming.

 

Child of Sir Fleming and Mrs. Fleming is:

i.    John Fleming, born Abt. 1350.

 

Generation No. 10

10. John Fleming was born Abt. 135. He married Mrs. Fleming.

     

Child of John Fleming and Mrs. Fleming is:

i.    Thomas Fleming, born Abt. 1380 in Wath, Yorkshire, England.

 

Generation No. 11

11. Thomas Fleming was born Abt. 1380 in Wath, Yorkshire, England, and died in . He married Mrs. Fleming.

Bishop of Lincoln and founder of Lincoln College, Oxford; b. of a good Yorkshire family about 1360, Croston being sometimes mentioned, though without clear authority, as his birthplace; d. at Sleaford, 25 Jan., 1431. He studied at University College, Oxford, and became junior proctor in 1407. In 1409 he was chosen by convocation as one of the twelve commissioners appointed to examine the writings of Wyclif, though at this time he was suspected of sympathy with the new movement and is mentioned by name in a mandate which Archbishop Arundel addressed to the chancellor in 1409 in order to suppress this tendency in the university. If the archbishop's description is correct the date usually assigned for Fleming's birth must be far too early, for a man close on fifty could not be mentioned as one of a company of beardless boys who had scarcely put away the playthin gs of youth. If he ever had any sympathy with Wyclif it did not exte nd to Wyclif's heretical doctrines, for his own orthodoxy was beyond suspicion and it subsequently became his duty as bishop to burn the exhumed body of Wyclif in 1428. He held successively the prebends of South Newbald, both in York Diocese, and subsequently was rector of Boston. He became bachelor in divinity some time before 1413. Finally he was elected Bishop of Lincoln, 20 Nov.,1419, in succession to Philip Repyngdon, and was consecrated at Florence, 28 April, 1420. In 1422 he was in Germany at the head of an embassy, and in June 1423 he acted as president of the English representatives at the Council of Pavia which was transferred to Siena and finally developed into the Council of Basle. More than once he preached before the council, but as he supported the rights of the pope against the assembled Fathers his views were disapproved of. The pope, however, showed him favour by appointing him as his chamberlain and naming him Archbishop of York in 1424. Difficulties, however, arose with the king's ministers, and the appointment was set aside. On returning to Lincoln, the bishop began the foundation of Lincoln College, which he intended to be a collegiolum of theologians connected with the three parish churches of St. Mildred, St. Michael, and Allhallows, Oxford. The preface which he wrote to the statutes is printed in the "Statutes of Lincoln College" (Oxford 1853 ). He proved a vigorous administrator of his diocese, and added to his cathedral a chantry in which he was subsequently buried. One work now lost, " Super Angliae Etymologia", is attributed to him by Bale.

     

Child of Thomas Fleming and Mrs. Fleming is:

i.    Sir William Fleming, born in Of Wath, Yorkshire, England; died 1470.

 

Generation No. 12

12. Sir William Fleming was born in Of Wath, Yorkshire, England, and died 1470. He married Mrs. Fleming.

The Fleming name had it’s origin from a region of either Belgium or Northern France then referred to as Flanders. Those who lived in this area spoke Flemish. The name Fleming refers to one who is a native of Flanders. The Flemish and Dutch language probably derived from one another. It is said that Robert Fleming and his wife spoke with a Dutch accent. Variation of the Fleming name are numerous: Flemming le Fleming, Flemings, Flemon, Fliming, Fleman, Flemans, Fleminge and Flemyng. Somewhere through the years Fleming has evolved from these variations.

 

Another brief History:
The name derives from the French, Le Fleming’. They hailed from Flanders and were once merchants who traded with England, Scotland and Wales in the 12th century. Baldwin a distinguished Flemish leader, settled with his followers in Biggar in Lanarkshire, under grant of David I. He also became sheriff of Lanark under Malcolm IV and William the Lion.

9 Flemings signed the Ragman Roll swearing fealty to Edward I of England in 1296, although one of the signatories, Sir Robert Fleming, was among the first to join Robert the Bruce and assist him after the death of Comyn at Dumfries in 1306.

In the year 1211 A. D. during the 13th year of King John, there lived Sir Michael Le Fleming who had five children as follows:

 

1. Sir Wm. Le Fleming, had a daughter Godith Le Fleming

2. Sir Richard Le Fleming

3. Rev. Daniel Le Flemin

4. Anselm Le Fleming

5. Jordan Le Fleming

 

Godith Le Fleming, daughter of Sir Wm. Le Fleming, married William De Esen by. She received from her father three carucates of land in Agarsslith and was a benefactress to the priory of St. Bees in Cumberland.

Sir Richard Le Fleming, second son of Sir Michael Le Fleming, called also Flandrensis and Flameng in several places and records, received the honor of Knighthood and seated himself at Caernavon Castle in the manor of Beckermet which Castle and Manor with the homage and service wards and reliefs of all the freeholders of Frisington, Rottington, Weddekar, Kelton, Salter, Arlochden and Burringg with the lands in Cumberland and the lands in Lancashire were given to him by his father, some of which estates were, as late as 1811 enjoyed by descendents of this family, either in lineal or collateral succession. Sir Richard died during the term of King John, and was succeeded by his only son.

Sir John Le Fleming of Beckermet, Knight, who conveyed to his Richard by a deed without date the land which his father had given him in Coupland. He also gave the patronage of the rectory of Arlochden and the land in Great Beckermet to the Abby of Chaldine in the 26th year of King Henry III 1241 A. D. Also, the Advowson of the church of St. John the Baptist of Beckermet was granted to this Abby which was confirmed by Archbishop of York 1262 A. D. Sir John died in the rein of King Henry III Cira. l 250 and was buried in the Abby of Caldne to which he had been a benefactor. It is stated that the Abby contained a very ancient statue in freestone of a man in armor a frett of six pieces upon his shield, lying upon h is back with a sword by his side, his hands elevated in a praying posture and his legs across which probably were so placed from the taking up on him the cross, after having been disposed of all his worldly goods and having been engaged in the Holy Wars (of the Crusaders) and, which statue was placed here, most probably in the memory of this Sir John Le Fleming.

The old Yorkshire house of Le Fleming of Wath which appears to be a branch of the original family of Cumberland.

 

Sir John Le Fleming, lord of Wath on Dearn Yorkshire, who died 14 year of Edward II reign 1321 A. D. left by Joan, his wife, daughter of Walter De Fauconberg, three sons:

I- Thomas Le Fleming of Wath of Dearn, ancestor of the Flemings of Wath, whose eventual heiress married Saville of New Hall.

II- Ranier Le Flemings

III- Lambert Le Flemings, a Knight Templer, who was put to death at Paris, with the Grand Master, by Phillip Le Bell.

 

The second son, Ranier Le Flemings, called Rainer De Wath, Chevalyr was in the Scottish wars in the retinue of Lord Percy. He married Ada, daughter of heir of Thomas De Bethume.

 

From Mannex's directory of Furness and Cartmel, 1882.
Is a township and chapelry stretching as far as the Three Shire Stone, the most northern limit of the county. It formed part of the domains of the old family of le Fleming, into whose possession it came in the time of Henry III. (1216-1272) by the marriage of Richard le Fleming with an heiress of Adam de Urswick. About the year 1409, Thomas le Fleming married Isabel, a daughter of Sir John de Lancaster, by whom he acquired the Manor of Rydal, in Westmorland. Coniston Hall, the residence of the le Fleming family for seven generations, is a low antique building on the borders of the lake.

     

Children of Sir Fleming and Mrs. Fleming are:

i.    Maud Fleming.

ii.   Elizabeth Fleming, born Abt. 1445; died 1470.

 

Generation No. 13

13. Elizabeth Fleming was born Abt. 1445, and died 1470. She married (1) Sir Richard Dalton, son of Sir Dalton and Margaret Holker. He was born Abt. 1445 in Of Dalton, Bispham & Croston, Lancashire, Eng., and died Aft. 1489. She married (2) Thomas Hesketh.

Notes for Elizabeth Fleming:
The Fleming name had it’s origin from a region of either Belgium or Northern France then referred to as Flanders. Those who lived in this area spoke Flemish. The name Fleming refers to one who is a native of Flanders. The Flemish and Dutch language probably derived from one another. It is said that Robert Fleming and his wife spoke with a Dutch accent. Variation of the Fleming name are numerous: Flemming le Fleming, Flemings, Flemon, Fliming, Fleman, Flemans, Fleminge and Flemyng. Somewhere through the years “Fleming” has evolved from these variations.

Elizabeth Fleming is probably descending from the Michael le Fleming II family that were the first holders of the moiety of Furness and was L rd of Aldingham in Furness, 1127, and Lord of Urswick. He held Bolton manor, 1127, which he gave to his daughter Godith, whose descendants in the Copeland family inherited it. Furthermore he held the manors of Bechermet, Frissington, Waddington, Rottingham, Waddicker, and Arlocdon. But his main property consisted of the manors of Aldingham and Urswick.

 

More about the le Fleming family:
The Fleming family derived its descent from Sir Michael le Fleming I, born in Caernarvon Castle, Beckermet and who accompanied his kinsman, Baldwin, Earl of Flanders, brother-in-law, of William of Normandy, to assist in the conquest of England in 1066 A. D. Sir Michael le Fleming's second son, Sir Richard le Fleming, was the grandfather of Richard le Fleming, who by marriage with Elizabeth Urswick, became possessed of Coniston Hall, and was the ancestor of Sir Daniel Fleming, of Coniston Hall and Rydal, who in the latter part of the seventeenth century made a pedigree of the Gilpin family, before referred to, the manuscript of which yet remains among the collections of S. H. Fleming, Esq., at Rydal Hall, in the English Lake District.

The manor of Arlecdon is included in the Fee of Beckermet, which is its lf a Fee of the lordship of Egremont. After the subjugation of the Cumbrian kingdom by William the Conqueror in 1072, he conferred the district up on his faithful friend and follower, William de Meschines, and that nobleman granted Arlecdon, together with Fizington, Rotington, Weddicar, and ot er places, to Michael le Fleming, Knt., a kinsman of baldwin, Earl of Flanders, and brother-in-kaw of the Conquror. From this Sir Micael are descended the Flemings of Rydal, in which family it still remains

William le Fleming, Lord of Aldingham, an ancient Saxon Manor in Furness, and who, in 1273, acquired the Lordship of Aldingham, which had come in to his hands in right of his wife on the death of her two brothers, John and William Cancefield, both of whom died in their minority and while under ward of the Abbot of Furness. The Flemings, from whom these Lancashire estates were inherited, had been in possession of Aldingham almost from the time of the Conqueror. One of them, Michael Flandreusis, or le

Fleming, a military adventurer who came to England out of Flanders, is said to have been in the retinue of Duke William of Normandy, and to have taken part in the struggle on the red field of Senlac and was rewarded by William the Conqueror with a grant of the Manor of Aldingham, of which the Saxon Thane, or Thegn, Ernulf, had previously dispossessed. He was living in 1126 when Stephen of Blois and Boulogne, afterwards King of Englan d, founded the Abbey of Furness, and his lands were exempted from the privileges granted the Abbot of Furness.

 

1. Michael le Fleming had three sons, William, who inherited Aldingham, Richard, who married Elizabeth Urswick, and Daniel.

2. William, eldest son of Michael le Fleming, married Alice, daughter of Thomas, son of Gospatric of Galloway. His son Michael and daughter Alice.

3. Michael le Fleming died young, about 1269, leaving a widow, Alina, and the Manor of Aldingham passed to Alice, sister of Michael, who conveyed it in marriage to Sir Richard Cancefield.

 

Note: The village of Aldingham Is bounded on the east by Morecambe bay; on the south west by the parish of Dalton; and on the north-west by that of Urswick. It is five miles in length, and three and a half in breath. It is divided into the four townships of Aldingham Lower and Upper, Gleaston, and Leece. The entire parish is included in the manor of Muchland, originally called Michael-land, from Sir Michael le Fleming, who received a grant of the demesne of this manor from the Conqueror. In process of time the name Michael was changed into the Scotch epithet Mickle, which signifies much, and the lands were finally corrupted into the appellation of Much-land. This also includes part of the parish of Urswick, called Much-Urswick. A court leet and baron, which were granted in 1199, by King John to William le Fleming and his heirs, are still held in this man or twice a year, at the court room at Seawood.

Note: Gleaston Castle's history began in the mid 13th century when the le Fleming family moved to the valley from nearby Aldingham which had been their seat of residence since 1066. Here they built a manor house, probably close to the centre of the existing castle yard. It is likely that it consisted of a wooden hall with an enclosure for cattle on the south side.

 

Notes for Sir Richard Dalton:

Some of what we know of Sir Richard Dalton of Croston is found in Film n o. 884561, Medieval, in the Salt Lake City Family History Library Archive s. The source being FLOWER'S VISITATION OF YORKSHIRE, 1563 (Harl.16) p. 8 6. And the Transactions Historic Soc. of Lancs. and Ches.

23 Aug. 1508:
For £200: Ralph Standish of Standysh, esq., to Thomas Heskyth, esq., -- ar bitration of Thomas, Earl of Derby, John Kyngesmill, Justice of Common Ple as, & Humfrey Conyngesby, Sergeant at Law, between Thomas Hesketh & Willi am Wall, clerk, Richard Dalton, esq., & Roger his son by Elizabeth daught er of William Flemmyng, esq, concerning properties in Croston & Mawdesley.

 

FILE - DDHE 26/20 - date: (2 Dec. 1481.)

Lease for life: Richard, son and heir of Robert Dalton, esq. to Margaret his mother -- properties in Maudesley in the tenure of Thomas Assheton: a close called the Yate Filde in the tenure of John Haresnape; another parcel of land called the Crabthorne Yorde in the tenure of Henry Wawan -- remainder to John his brother. Witn: James Scaresbrik, esq., Thomas Bradshagh, of Litherland, Thomas Maudesley and others. Given at Maudesley Mon. after St. Katherine Virgin, 21 Ed. IV.

 

FILE [no title] - ref. DDB 20/1 - date: 5 Apr. 1483

Lease for 22 years at rent of red rose: Margaret widow of Robert Dalton, esq. and Richard his son and heir, to John Haliwall and Geoffrey Wallhi ll -- a close called the Hillfild in Heskyn, late in tenure of Richard Johnson and Robert Haliwall, lying between the Marehay and the Eghtenac re -- Witn. Master Thomas Maudesley, perpetual vicar of Croston, James Hal sall, Robert Standissh. Given at Heskyn.

     

Children of Elizabeth Fleming and Sir Dalton are:

i.    Ellen Dalton, born Abt. 1465. She married Mr. Rigby.

ii.   Sir Roger Dalton, born Abt. 1469 in Of Dalton Hall, Bispham, Croston And Mawdesley, Lancashire; died Abt. 1531 in Byspham Manor, Lancashire England.

 

Sir Roger Dalton was born Abt. 1469 in Of Dalton Hall, Bispham, Croston And Mawdesley, Lancashire, and died Abt. 1531 in Byspham Manor, Lancashire England. He married (1) Anne Radcliff, daughter of John Radcliff and Elizabeth Brereton. She was born 1476 in Wymerly, Lancashire, England, and died in . He married (2) Miss Standyche. He married (3) Mary Faryngton, daughter of Sir William Farrington. He married (4) Jane Jakes, daughter of Roger Jakes and Mawde Shordyche.

 

Roger Dalton of Croston was born about 1470.

He married:

1) Anne Radcliff.

2) Miss Standyce - no issue

3) Miss Farynton - no issue

4) Jane Jakes - issue

 

By 1500, Richard's son, Roger was associated as heir with his father in the grant of various lands in Croston and Mawdesley, but reserving the Man or and demesne lands. The various deeds and documents show that just as Richard had gone further afield, and established himself at Croston during his father's lifetime, so Roger was doing the same thing, and building up a family inheritance of increasing value. He is described on the ped igree as "of Dalton Hall, Yorks, and after, of Croston."

Roger married Anne, a daughter of Sir John Ratclyff. Anne was born in Wymerly in about 1475. In the Herald's Visitation of Lancashire in 1613, Roger is the earliest Dalton ancestor named in connection with the Ratclyffs. The date of their marriage is not known, but as a grant of various tenements in Bispham was made to Roger's son William as early as 1500, it must have taken place some time before that.

The Ratcliff or Radclyff family, the Ancestor says "were truly among the most ancient Lancashire families." (See Genealogists Magazine, Vol. I X, p. 137 (March 1941) (Review of Book of the Radclyffs 1940). Anne Ratcliff's family descended directly from King Henry II of England through his mistress, Rosemund, and their son William, Earl of Salisbury 1173-1225.

In 1525 Roger Dalton's name is on the list of the land-owners in Croston Parish contributing to the Subsidy, others being Thomas Ashton, Henry Banastre, Robert and Bartholomew Hesketh, and a few others. He was associated with his father in 1527 in the making of a grant which mentions William Dalton the elder, his uncle, as still living then.


Roger Dalton was the husband of no less than four wives, and the father of at least 16 children. Roger and his first wife, Anne Ratcliff, had:

1. Roger, who left no issue.

2. Sybell, married William Wolberd Draper and reportedly left no issue.

3. Thomas, born 1508.

4. William was born in 1513 in Byspham

 

Roger's second wife was a Miss Standyche, and his third a Miss Farynton, but he had "no issue by his second or third wifes. " He made up for it by his 4 th wife, Jane, daughter and one of four heirs of Roger Jakes of Barkemsted and of Mawde Shordyche. Jane gave him 8 sons and 5 daughters:

I . Lawrence. He married Dorothy Bream. He became a Herald, Norroy King of Arms. His line still survives in the year 2000. Lawrence died on December 13, 1561, and is buried at St. Dunstan's in West London.

2. Margaret who married, first, Richard Pawley of London, Fishmonger, who was the father of two children: Walter and Dorothy Pawley. She married, secondly Thomas Weston of London, a tailor.

3. Anne. She married Thomas Baker of Barkensted. There is no doubt that this was the Berkhamsted, within 30 miles of London, in Hertfordshire, which was Jane Jakes' native place. Anne Baker had five children.

4. Cyssely, who married Chygwell of Essex.

5. Elizabeth who married Francis Colbarne and had two girls.

6. Daughter (no name given) married first Richard Nott/Knott of London "a le bruer", and secondly, Robert Vady.

7. 7 other sons did not survive.

 

Evidently Roger Dalton's second family (as adults) migrated in force to London. But out of this whole great family, only two males survived to carry on the family name - William (our line) and his half brother, Lawrence.


England: Canterbury - Wills Proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 1383-1558 (A-J)

County: General

Country: England

1543 Dalton, Roger, esquire, Croston, Lancashire; Dalton, Yorks. F. 29 Spe rt

 

The Will of Roger Dalton of Croston:
Roger is described in the pedigree as of Dalton Hall in Yorkshyre and after of Croston. He was still possessed of lands in Yorkshire at the date of his will, but presumably moved to Croston at some stage. Perhaps on succeeding at the death of his father.

The will of Roger Dalton was proved in the Prerogative Court of the Archbishop of Canterbury and I have obtained from the Public Record Office (ref 11/29) a photocopy of the enrolment of the will and of a document enrolled with it in the records of the Court. Both are in Latin, sometimes much abbreviated, and are not easy to transcribe. I may have made some mist kes in my transcriptions, but I think they are substantially accurate. I think that for some of the information they give, they are worth transcribing fairly fully.

 

The will reads:
"In the name of God Amen the tenth day of March in the year of our Lord 15 31, I, Roger Dalton Knight of sound mind and good memory but sick in b dy make my will in this form First I bequeath my soul to omnipotent God and the blessed Mary and all the saints and elect of the church a nd my body to be buried in a small religious tomb in the church of Saint Michael the Archangel of Croston in the chancel of the same church with the permission and the provision of the curate of the same for the time being in office next to the tomb of my father (corpus quo meum ad sepelie nd in parva sepultura ecclesiastiva sancti Michis Arch ecclie de Crost on in cancello eiusdem cum licencia et providencia curati siusdem tunc pro tempe existen juxta sepultur patris mei). Then I give and bequeath a mortuary payment to the vicar of the same church according to the Act made and constituted by the King. Next I give and bequeath to my daughters, Anne, Margaret, Joan and Elizabeth two hundred marks. Then I give and bequeath to my son Richard, four marks yearly until he be promoted to some benefice of ten pounds or more a year (donec sit promotus ad aliquot beneficed ecem librarum annuatim aut ultra) And I wish that all other things are at the disposition of Roger Jakes, Thomas Jakes and my son Richard whom I ordain make and constitute my true and lawful executors that they themselves may dispose for the benefit of my soul or as may seem better to them Then I ordain and constitute Henry Faryington, Knight Richard Bonaster, Bankes Knight and Richmond supervisors of this my testament and will. Then I wish that any debts not paid at the date of my death may be paid out of my goods. In witness of which things I have placed on this my will of one sheet of paper my seal, Given the day and year above stated."

 

The will was proved in London on the 6th December 1543 by Roger Jakes a nd Richard Dalton.

 

Enrolled with the will in the Prerogative Court records is a document even more difficult to transcribe than the will and also in Latin. But in substance I think it says;
"Know all men present and future that I, Roger Dalton, Knight, have given determined and by this my document confirmed to Anthony Lathom, gentleman, Thomas Bond, Vicar of the Church of Croston, Richard Clerk, Vicar of the Church of Leigh and Adam Bonaster, all my messuages, lands, tenements, meadows, grazings, pastures, rents and all their appurtenances in Dalton in the County of Yorkshire (in Dalton in comitate Eboraci) to have and to hold all and singular these messuages, lands, tenements and other premises aforesaid to Anthony Lathom, Thomas Bond, Richard Clerk and Adam Bonaster and their assigns for ever to the use and intent of fulfilling this my last will and testament annexed to this document so that after fulfilling the said will all the said messuages, lands, tenements and other premises may remain wholly and rightly to the heir's of me the said Roger in perpetuity."

There then follow sentences in which Roger appears to say that he and his heirs will warrant and defend all the said premises to Anthony Thomas, Richard and Adam against all men and he appoints Thomas Lathom as his lawful attorney to obtain possession of all the said premises for Anthony Thomas, Richard and Adam.

 

The document was sealed by Roger with his seal in the presence of John Smyth, chaplain George Nelson, Thomas Graveson, John Stopforth and others on the 10th day of March in the 23rd year of the reign of King Henry VI II (1531).

********************************************

 

The History of the Towneley Family of Bumley, England    Top

 

Jane Towneley married William Dalton, born 1513 at Byspham Manor, Lancashire, England.

 

 

Descendants of Galfridus Of Whalley

Generation No. 1

1. Galfridus of Whalley

Notes for Galfridus Of Whalley:

TOWNELEYS - descendants of THE DEANS OF WHALLEY

Sources:
History of Whalley, History of Burnley, Visitations, Pedigree, British Arc hives, and Manuscripts of Christopher Towneley.

According to Whitaker, the earliest known ancestor of the Towneleys of Burnley, Lancashire, England, was a Saxon named Spartlingus, the first De an of Whalley upon record, who was living in 896 during the reign of King Alfred of England (d.899). As dean, he managed property of the church at the monastery of Whalley, collected the tithes and other revenues, and nominated the priests who served the church. All the early church records of Christian countries were in Latin which explains the spelling of t he names of the deans. The coming of the Normans invaders in 1066 made little change in the operation of the church, but they did choose the Dean nd set aside large areas of forest for the king and his friends to hunt deer and wild boar. The church collected the profits from large tracts of land as the parish of Whalley covered almost a third of Lancashire, but it w as the Norman Lord living at the castle at Clitheroe who held all of Lancashire. Following the conquest, William I granted Clitheroe to Roger of Poitou, but later it passed into the hands of the de Lacy family. Whitaker claimed that after the death of Spartlingus, the position of Dean passed from father to son down to Henricus 2nd, but since he based this solely on t he writings of Abbot Lyndelay, it has not been accepted by the College of Arms. When Henricus 2nd died without heirs, his authority passed to his brother.

1st Dean: Spartlingus

2nd Dean: Liwolphus Cutwolphe, who supposedly acquired his name after cutting off the tail of a wolf while hunting in Rossenda le.

3rd Dean: Cutwolphus

4th Dean: Henrius

5th Dean: Roburtus, who had five children, Henricus 2nd, Wilhielmus, Galfridus, George, and Thomas. George and Thomas were witnesses to a charter of their brother Galfridus.

6th Dean: Henricus 2nd, Dean post Robertus.

7th Dean: Wilhielmus, Dean post his brother Henricus.

8th Dean: John, Dean post his father Wilhielmus; when John died without heirs, the honor of Dean of Whalley passed to his uncle Galfridus. (according to the Towneley Pedigree at the Hall, the honor went directly from Wilhielmus to his brother Galfridus)

9th Dean: Galfridus, uncle of John, m. Alice, dau. of Roger de Lacy.

10th Dean: Galfridus 2nd (Geoffrey), after his father, alive in 1223.

11th Dean: Roger, son of Geoffrey, the last Dean of Whalley for in 1215 the church at Rome had banned priests from marrying.

By the 13th century, the Honor of Clitheroe had been divided up into five manors. About this time, Galfridus married Alice de Lacy, daughter of the Norman Lord Roger de Lacy of Clitheroe and Pontefract, the Constable of Chester (d.bfr.1212). Lord de Lacy gave part of the village of Burnley, in the Manor of Ightenhill of the Honour of Clitheroe, to Dean Galfri us, namely "two oxgangs of land in Tunleia (the field belonging to the town) with their appurtenances and permission to build his home there when he pleased and the right to pasture cattle on Burnley Commons." The word "oxgang" and the right of common pasture shows the re were villeins living in a hamlet which formed part of the village of Burnley, so Galfridus had the right to demand services from tenants. Like the colonists in Pennsylvania and New England, these tenants scraped a living from vegetables in their gardens, crops grown in a town field, and cattle kept on common land. When they built their wood huts at the end of their lots in a group with the land they leased fanning out around them, the huts created a hamlet. Close by in the village of Burnley were several other hamlets, named Westgate, Coal Clough, Fulledge, Burnley Wood and Healey.

Lord de Lacy's also gave Galfridus the right to hunt deer and wild boar "beyond his domains." He had the power to make this grant for he was responsible for the forests reserved for only the king and his supporters. Since Galfridus was dean of Whalley, he lived in the ancestral home at Whalley, but it is believed that he built a hunting lodge on Castle Hill, near t he junction of Todmorden Road and the Bacup Road. Dr. Whitaker wrote in 1800 that there were obscure remains of trenches on the east side of the hill. The hunting grounds de Lacy provided for Galfid us adjoining Hapton extended from the head of Thursden on the east to Bradley Brook [Hapton] on the west, and from Saxifield Dyke on the north to Crombrok [Redwater Clough, Cliviger] on the south. Dean Galfidus and his wife Alice had three children: Geoffrey (Galfidus 2nd), Henry Gedling, and Robert of the church at Alvetham and later at Rochdale. When Dean Galfrid us died, his namesake Geoffrey inherited his father's position as dean and the settlement from his mother's father. In 1224, Geoffrey left his es tate including Tunleia, Snodesworth and Coldcoats (Caldecotes), part way b etween Whalley and Clitheroe, to his son Roger, the next dean. But sin ce Roger was not allowed to marry, he gave these lands to his brother Richard about 1236. Roger died without issue in 1249. The names in italics in the remainder of the history have been recorded by the Royal College of Arms.

Child of Galfridus Of Whalley is:

i.    Richard De Towneley.

 

Generation No. 2

2. Richard De Towneley (Galfridus Of Whalley) He married (1) Cecelila De Thunley.

The origin of the name Townley (or Towneley) is English. The meaning of t he name Townley is given in "A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surname s, by C. W. Bardsley, 1901, as:

Local, "of Townley" an ancient manor in Habergham Eaves, Burnley, co. Lanc. The place gave rise to a family of distinction in very early times. Richard de Townley was sheriff on Lancashire, 1376-1379. The surname is now scattered over the country, either through younger branches of the representative family or humbler stocks. Townley is simply a reversal of the syllables in Layton, or Leyton, or Leighton. Townley emphasizes the relation of the meadow to the farm, the others the relation of the farm to the meadow. Townley means the farm-meadow, the others the meadow-farm.

The first of this name on record seems to be Richard de Towneley who married Cecelia de Thunley. Their daughter, Cecelia, who eventually became the sole heir, was living around the year 1330. Their heirs eventually reassumed the name de Towneley.

Towneley Hall, the ancestral home of the Towneley family, is located in the County of Lancashire, England, about 219 miles northwest of the city of London. The stone manor house in part dates from the 13th century. It is about a mile from the town of Burnley and is located on picturesque grounds consisting of thousands of acres of green fields and noble trees. The estate is now the property of the government but many of the treasures, such as the library, were sold at auction when Colonel John Towneley, the last heir died in 1878. When he died his two sons were both already dead, Richard having been killed in a duel with an Italian officer in Rome in 1877 and Charles dying earlier at the Hall. However, many treasures still remain in the vast house including portraits of the early Towneleys. There are many of Richard Towneley and his wife Margaret Paston and f mily.

The Townleys of Townley Hall were originally Catholic, as were all English before Henry VIII, and John Towneley who died sometime in the beginning of'the 16th century, was imprisoned for his Roman Catholic belief and was finally condemned to pay a yearly sum into the Treasury of England, and not allowed to go five miles beyond his own house. One of the buildings on the estate is a Chapel, containing an altar which was brought from Rome. There are also stables which accommodated many horses. In the latter part of the 18th century, during the time of the Grand Tour, Charles Townley travelled incognito in Italy and among the classical ruins he collected antiquities, now known as the "Townley Marbles". Charles and his collection, in part, founded the British Museum in London.

Across the Irish channel in County Louth, near Drogheda, there is a second and more recent "Townley Hall." Sir William Balfour, Governor of the Tower under Charles 1, settled in Ireland following the purchase of an estate from his uncle. Eventually the Balfour heir, Lucy, married Blaney Townley and the estate became known as the Townley estate in 1692.

Townley Hall near Drogheda, overlooking the River Boyne, is also set up on rolling parklike landscape. The grey limestone mansion is one of impressive austerity. It is a square building with a Doric columned portico and with an unusual central spiral staircase, all designed by architect Francis Johnson around 1790. The owner-builder was Blaney Townley-Balfour who married Lady Florence Cole. The furnishings of the home include their portraits. The occupants of Townley Hall were frequently collectors and t he furnishings are remarkable.

In the year 1200, King John granted the land "Towneley" (meaning, Field be long to the Tuni) to Roger de Lacy, Norman landowner and Constable of Charter. In 1200 Roger de Lacy gave the "Tunleiu" to Geoffrey, Dean of Whalley, who had married the daughter of Roger de Lacy. Then in 1236 Richard (grandson of Geoffrey, Dean of Whalley) inherited Towneley Estate. He combin ed Towneley and Cecilia de Thunlaig estates when he married Cecilia.Richard de Towneley d. 1295 built the first house on Towneley land.

About 1250 Richard built the first house at Tunleia and adopted the name Towneley. This was not uncommon. (See the de Wolffs of Swabia) Even his uncle Henry Gedling, who was living in 1259, adopted the new surname, which i ndicates that he was living at Towneley. During Richard's lifetime the village of Burnley began to develop. In 1290 a corn-mill was built, and in 129 4, Henry de Lacy obtained a charter from Edward I granting the right to have a weekly market on Tuesday in their manor of Burnley and a three day fair every year on the eve, day and morrow of the Feast of the Apostles Peter and Paul. However, it was not until the year after Richard's death that the a fulling-mill, where woollen cloth was finished, was built on the banks of the Brun not far from the church.

The children of Richard and his wife Cecelia were: Nicholas, Alicia, Agnes, and Cecelia. Nicholas, who was alive in 1242, was called Peter in a visitation record by Sir William Dugdale in 1664/5, which was revised by Mr. William Langton in 1873 from evidence collected by Christopher Towneley. When Richard Towneley died in 1295, Nicholas inherited Snodesworth, Caldecotes, and two thirds of Tunleia, while the widow Cecelia "Thunlay," received one third of "Thunlay," and land at Worsthorne, Brunsh aw [Bronshay], and Altoft, which she had brought to her marriage. As a settlement for her daughter Cecelia, the widow gave her holding at

Worsthorne and Towneley to her new son-in-law, John de la Leigh, a landless gentle man living at the abbey. When Nicholas Towneley died without any heirs, h is estate was divided between his sister Alicia, wife of Robert Hopkinson, and his sister Agnes, wife of John del Hargreaves. Since Alicia survived her husband and had no children, at her death her third of Towneley passed to her sister Cecelia 2nd, which she held in her own right as John de la Leigh had already been provided with her marriage settlement.

 

Child of Richard De Towneley and Cecelila De Thunley is:

i.    Cecelia De Thunlaig-Towneley.

     

Child of Richard De Towneley is:

i.    John De La Leigh.

 

Generation No. 3

3. Cecelia De Thunlaig-Towneley. She married John De La Leigh, son of Richard De Towneley.

About 1295 John de la Leigh inherited Townley Estate.

John de la Leigh, aft. 1349 of the White House, Cliviger, husband of Cecel ia Towneley.

The earliest known document mentioning Burnley is a charter of 1122, by which Hugh de la Val granted the church of St. Peter to the monks of Pontefract Priory. The town began as a small farming community that grew up around the church in a clearing in the woodland that covered much of the district in the Middle Ages. After the death of Alice de la Ley, her son Thomas de la Leigh, the brother of John, founded a chantry in Burnley Church in memory of his mother. Since her husband Gilbert de la Ley and her son John de la Leigh had also given gifts to the church, they were granted a corrody (corody) in 1295 by the Abbot of Whalley, providing them with housing, food, and clothing. In 1302 Gilbert de la Ley was named in a charter of Henry de Lacy as the son of Michael de la Leye, who was given land in the township of Extwistle by the abbot at Newbo, a monastery in Lincolnshire. That same year, Gilbert was made a grantee of Hapton by Thomas de Altaripa. Gilbert was lord of the manor at Hapton, tenant of 140 acres in Cliviger, tenant of a cow farm at Whitebough [Barley], and holder of part of Extwistle. In 1304 he lost Hapton, which was granted to Edmund Talbot by Henry de Lacy, and in 1321 he settled Cliviger on his grandchildren. His daughter Margeria, the wife of William de Mi ddlemore, also held land in Cliviger, called Holme, in her own right. In 1328, John Talbot, the son and heir of Edmund Talbot, again granted Hapton to Gilbert de la Ley, so he gave his holding at Extwistle to his son John de la Leigh. Since John had received Worsthorne and one third of Towneley from his mother-in-law, land at Worsthorne, Towneley, Ext wistle, and Cliviger were united in one family.

John de la Leigh lived at "The Old House," also called the White House, an ancient farmstead at the foot of Castle Hill in Cliviger. Cecelia died before 1323, and her one-third of Towneley was inherited by her husband. Since Gilbert de la Ley gave Hapton to his grandson Gilbert de la Leigh as a marriage settlement in 1336, John de la Leigh gave his wife's third and his own third of Towneley to his second son, Richard, who then assumed the surname de Towneley. After the death of John del Hargreaves, the husband of Cecelia's other sister, the third share of Towneley passed to his son William. In 1338, William del Hargreaves "granted to Richard de Towneley, son of John de la Leigh, the land and tenements which he [William] had from his father in Towneley and the reversion of those of his mother and of Alice [Alicia], the widow of Robert Hopkinson." In law, a reversion is the return of an estate to the grantor. Richard accepted the two for one trade because William's third included the manor of Towneley. William was probably well paid for his two shares of Towneley by Gilbert de la Leigh who wanted additional land near his Hapton property. In 1340 (14Edw.III), John de la Leigh received a new grant of corody from the Abbot and Convent of Whalley and moved back to the monastery. " He died in his father's lifetime."

     

Child of Cecelia De Thunlaig-Towneley and John De La Leigh is:

i.    Gilbert De La Legh-Towneley.

 

John De La Leigh (Richard2 De Towneley, Galfridus Of1 Whalley) He married Cecelia De Thunlaig-Towneley, daughter of Richard De Towneley and Cecelila De Thunley.

About 1295 John de la Leigh inherited Townley Estate.

John de la Leigh, aft. 1349 of the White House, Cliviger, husband of Cecel ia Towneley.

The earliest known document mentioning Burnley is a charter of 1122, by which Hugh de la Val granted the church of St. Peter to the monks of Pontefract Priory. The town began as a small farming community that grew up around the church in a clearing in the woodland that covered much of the district in the Middle Ages. After the death of Alice de la L y, her son Thomas de la Leigh, the brother of John, founded a chantry in Burnley Church in memory of his mother. Since her husband Gilbert de la Ley and her son John de la Leigh had also given gifts to the church, they were granted a corrody (corody) in 1295 by the Abbot of Whalley, providing them with housing, food, and clothing. In 1302 Gilbert de la Ley was named in a charter of Henry de Lacy as the son of Michael de la Leye, who was given land in the township of Extwistle by the abbot at Newbo, a monastery in Lincolnshire. That same year, Gilbert was made a grantee of Hapton by Thomas de Altaripa. Gilbert was lord of the manor at Hapton, tenant of 140 acres in Cliviger, tenant of a cow farm at Whitebough [Barley], and holder of part of Extwistle. In 1304 he lost Hapton, which was granted to Edmund Talbot by Henry de Lacy, and in 1321 he settled Clivig er on his grandchildren. His daughter Margeria, the wife of William de Mi ddlemore, also held land in Cliviger, called Holme, in her own right. In 1328, John Talbot, the son and heir of Edmund Talbot, again granted Hapton to Gilbert de la Ley, so he gave his holding at Extwistle to his son John de la Leigh. Since John had received Worsthorne and one third of Towneley from his mother-in-law, land at Worsthorne, Towneley, Ext wistle, and Cliviger were united in one family.

John de la Leigh lived at "The Old House," also called the White House, an ancient farmstead at the foot of Castle Hill in Cliviger. Cecelia di ed before 1323, and her one-third of Towneley was inherited by her husband. Since Gilbert de la Ley gave Hapton to his grandson Gilbert de la Leigh as a marriage settlement in 1336, John de la Leigh gave his wife's third and his own third of Towneley to his second son, Richard, who then assumed the surname de Towneley. After the death of John del Hargreaves, the husband of Cecelia's other sister, the third share of Towneley passed to his son William. In 1338, William del Hargreaves "granted to Richard de Towneley, son of John de la Leigh, the land and tenements which he [William] had from his father in Towneley and the reversion of those of his mother and of Alice [Alicia], the widow of Robert Hopkinson." In law, a reversion is the return of an estate to the grantor. Richard accepted the two for one trade because William's third included the manor of Towneley. William was probably well paid for his two shares of Towneley by Gilbert de la Leigh who wanted additional land near his Hapton property. In 1340 (14Edw.III), John de la Leigh received a new grant of corody from the Abbot and Convent of Whalley and moved back to the monastery. " He died in his father's lifetime."

     

Child is listed above under (3) Cecelia De Thunlaig-Towneley.

Generation No. 4

4. Gilbert De La Legh-Towneley. He married Alice Vernon. She was born in Warforth, Cheshire, England.

Notes: Gilbert took his mothers maiden name of Towneley.

The children of Cecelia and John de la Leigh were: the heir Gilbert de la Leigh, Richard de Towneley, and Laurence who was called de la Leigh when he broke the law by hunting in forests belonging to the Chaplin of the King (only to be pardoned for trespass by the king) because he as living at Cliviger, but he was called Towneley in the entail of Cliviger in 1321 because this land then belonged to the Towneleys. Dr. Whitaker called them typical representatives of a 14th century land-owning family. In 1336, Gilbert de la Ley gave Hapton to his grandson, Gilbert de la Leigh, as a settlement when he married Katherine, the daughter of Richard de Balderstone. Gilbert de la Leigh lived at Hapton and conducted his estate as a manor with a demesne farm (Castle Hill) and other farms rented by tenants. When Katherine died, Gilbert married Alice Vernon of Warforth, Cheshire, in 1344. He died during the reign of Richard. (6 Rich2) His widow held his estate, including two thirds of Towneley, until she died in 1388. The Inquisition of her estate took place that same year.

 

Child of Gilbert De La Legh-Towneley and Alice Vernon is:

i.    Sir Richard De Towneley, died 1379 in England.

 

Generation No. 5

6. Sir Richard De Towneley. died 1379 in England. He married Elena.

The first of the de la Leighs to use the Towneley name was Richard who was Sheriff of the county of Lancaster when he died in 1379 but it was his son John de Towneley (1350-1399) who acquired all the old Towneley land and sealed the settlement of his estates with the arms of three mullets and a fesse. It is believed that the earliest hunting lodge at Towneley was on Castle Hill and it was probably Richard or John who established the first house on the site of what is now Towneley Hall.

Meanwhile, Richard de Towneley had acquired the manor of Towneley in 133 8. His wife Elena was mentioned in 1345 in a deed of Alice, the widow of Ralph de Stirzaker. They had four children: John, Robert, Henry and Alice. Two sons became chaplains, and in 1356 (30Edw3), their daughter married Edmund Dacre, son of Sir Thomas Dacre. Richard became a member of Parliament for the shire in 1361; his stay lasted 51 days and his pay was 19/12/00. In 1369, Richard was appointed a Commissioner to enforce certain statutes, including the Statue of Weights and Measures and the Statute of Labor, which fixed wages of manual laborers in Lancaster. He was not a staid politician; he was once accused of riotous behavior at Whalley Abbey. To pay debts, he borrowed money on his third of Towneley from his uncle, Thomas de la Leigh, who then held the right to collect the rents. In 1372 his uncle executed a deed of rents which forgave all debts of the manor of Towneley and other premises held in trust jointly with Robert Holden, the son of Adam Holden, which they had by grant of Elias de Briddetwisle, Rector of Warrington, and Robert de Boulton, chaplain. Robert Holden lost a lot of money, and his descendants still refer to Thomas as a swindler. (It was a descendant of these Holdens who years later arranged the emigration of James Maginnis of Whitehaven.) In 1375, 1376, and 1377, John of Gaunt appointed Richard as Sheriff of Lancaster, and in 1377 he was re-elected as a member of Parliament. Richard was still the Sheriff when he died in 1379. The Inquisition of his estate was held in 1381.

The origins of the name and family can be summarised as:

According to one report King John granted the land "Towneley" or "Tunlei a" (field belonging to the Tunior, more likely, field belonging to the town) to Roger de Lacy, Constable of Chester - about 1195. The other version is that Roger inherited the land as part of his estates in Clitheroe and Pontefract.

Roger de Lacy gave the land in "Tunleia" to Geoffrey, Dean of Whalley, who had married his daughter - before 1211.

Richard, grandson of Geoffrey, inherited the land (about 1236) - then married widow Cecilia de Thunlay and combined estates

John de la Leigh married their daughter Cecilia and inherited the Towneley Estates - about 1295

Their son Sir Richard took the name - de Towneley (he was Sheriff of Lancaster from 1375 to 1379)

His son John de Towneley was the first recorded user of the currently accepted coat of arms.

The name of the family estate has been recorded as Towneley, Townley and Townly.

     

Child of Sir De Towneley and Elena is:

i.    John De Towneley, born 1343; died 1399.

 

Generation No. 6

6. John De Towneley was born 1343, and died 1399. He married Isabel Rixton 1382.

An inquisition post mortem was held on his estate in 1410. The Towneley M SS contain a protection from King Richard II for the estate and effects of John while he went to Guines with Sir John Talbot (later earl of Shrewsbury).

Sir John de Towneley 1350-1399. Arms: Argent, a fesse and 3 mullets in chief, sable formerly used by the de la Leighs "The King's Man"

John was reported as 31 years of age at the Inquisition of his father's estate in 1381. In 1382 he signed a marriage contract with Isabella, the daughter and heiress of William Rixton. They had two children, a son Richard and a daughter Matilda. John was sent by King Richard II on a special mission to Calais, but forfeited the protection of the king for staying in Kent on his own business from 1385 to 1389. While he was in Kent his aunt died, and at the age of 38, he inherited all her lands. In addition to Hapton, he now held all of Towneley. He sealed the settlement of his estates with "three mullets and a fesse" which was the seal used formerly by the de la Leighs. When Isabella died, he remarried, and in 1397 he became one of the coroners for the County of Lancaster. In 1399 he was "granted 6/13/4d. a year to stay with the King." He died that same year; at the time, his son was only 12 years of age. His widow Elizabeth remarried William Rigmayden, Esq., but she died Mar. 27, 1401 (3Henry4). On Apr. 7, 1401, Richard was made the ward of William Rigmayden. However since Elizabeth had died, Richard and his sister Matilda later became the wards of Sir Thomas Fleming, the Baron of Wrath, the grandfather of Matilda's future husband William Fleming, the son and heir of Sir John Fleming, son and heir of Sir Thomas, and administration of the estate was given to Roger of Banastre. A Lancaster Inquest (II, p. 84) said Roger made a waste of the property.

 

Child of John De Towneley and Isabel Rixton is:

i.    Richard Towneley, born Abt. 1387; died Abt. 1454.

 

Generation No. 7

7. Richard Towneley was born Abt. 1387, and died Abt. 1454. He married Alice.

Notes: Ward of the Duke of Lancaster. Legally inherited estate in 1410. Fought with King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt in October 1415.

Sir Richard Towneley, 1387,-c1454, first builder of Towneley Hall

In 1410 Richard got legal control of Towneley. That same year, a royal writ was issued ordering Richard and three others to be arrested and taken to Westminister for "trespass on the lands of Thomas Talbot of Hapton and taking away his cattle." (Towneley MSS) But it seems another Towneley was forgiven by a king who needed his services. Richard served in Fra ce under Henry V and took with him two footmen and three archers, all five being Towneley men from the estate. In October 1415, they fought at the Battle of Agincourt. Richard's son John was born that same year; he and his wife Alice later had a son Richard. Sir Towneley restored good management to his estate and acquired new lands at Dutton and Clayton. Richard began building the main hall of Towneley in the early 15th century. Later two wings would be added and the property enclosed. He died about 1454, survived by his wife Alice. At the Inquisition of his estate in 1455, the manor at Towneley was worth ten pounds a year, for which Richard had paid a part of a knight's fee and a rent of 12/9 d. Hapton and Bradley were worth 11 pounds a year, and Cliviger was worth ten pounds a year. The remaining estates were worth two pounds a year. (Lancs. Inquests II, p. 58-66) His son John was his heir to the Towneley estate, and his son Richard inherited Dutton.

 

Child of Richard Towneley and Alice is:

i.    Sir John Towneley, born 1415; died 1473.

 

Generation No. 8

8. Sir John Towneley was born 1415, and died 1473. He married (1) Isabel Butler. He married (2) Isabel Sherburne 16 Apr 1445. She was born Abt. 1408, and died in .

Towneley Hall.

Notes: During his time he had the South wing built on Towneley Hall. The walls are six feet thick.

John de Towneley, Esq. 1415-1473, built gatehouse chapel in 1454,built the South Wing about 1460.

John Towneley was first married at the age of three (6Henry7) at the door of the Church of St. Michael on the Wyre to Isabella Boteler [Butler], the daughter of Nicholas Boteler of Rawcliffe (Lancs. Inquests II, p. 25), but she was awarded a divorce in 1442 when she pointed out to the court that she had been betrothed to a neighbor two years before her marriage to John Towneley. Since Towneley marriages were arranged carefully to increase the family fortunes, it would be interesting to know exactly what happened. At the age of 40, John married Isabel Sherburne, the daughter of Richard Shireburn of Stoneyhurst, who brought a valuable estate in Flintshire as her dower. Their marriage settlement was dated Apr. 16, 1445. They had six children: Richard, Lawrence, Nicholas, Henry, Bernard, and Grace. John Towneley added a private chapel in the gatehouse in 1454 (Register of Litchfield Jan. 12, 1454), which was served by his son Bernard Towneley, L.L.D., and Richard Boyes. (The gateway, chapel, and library were removed by Charles Towneley 1658-1712, and the chapel and library were re-sited in the North wing.) John Towneley paid 17 shillings for his relief on May 31, 1456. He built the South wing of Towneley Hall abo ut 1460; its 6 foot thick medieval walls have remained unchanged, but the doors and all but one window have been replaced. Isabella died before 1462, but John lived another ten years. Their son Sir Richard was t he heir of Towneley, their second son Lawrence lived at Barnside ten miles northeast of Towneley, Nicholas was at Greenfield six miles north of Towneley, Henry married an heiress in Dutton fourteen miles northwest of Towneley, and Barnard became the parson at Felkirk. Grace married Roger, son of Alexander Nowell of Read. Nicholas of Greenfield was the ancestor of Townleys of Royal, Littleton, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, and Ohio. Townsleys of Lancaster and York, Pa., and Maryland were not related.

Meanwhile, John's brother Richard and his wife Ellen were living at Dutton in the parish of Ribchester. Richard of Dutton was the first to adopt the name Townley, and it became the practice of all younger sons to drop the "e" in Towneley when they left the manor. Up to this point all the Towneley males who were not heirs had become priests, died young, or left home and changed their surname. On other estates, peasants took the name of the manor, but this was not done at Towneley. Thus the name Towneley had been passed down only by the heirs of Towneley. Others took the name of the manor only if they lived at Towneley, such as Henry Gedling and Lawrence de la Leigh. The Burnley website claims there was no "rule," but the fact is that from Sir Richard who died in 1482 to the orphaned Mary Towneley born in 1541, the heirs at the Hall were called Towneley, while other descendants were all called Townley unless they lived at Towneley. Henry Towneley who married an heiress to estates in Dutton and his cousin Robert Townley of Dutton were the ancestors of Townleys of Rochdale, who were lawyers and merchants. Among their descendants was a Henry Townley who called himself Towneley because he lived at Towneley and sold cloth, ribbons and garterings in Burnley.

     

Child of Sir Towneley and Isabel Sherburne is:

i.    Sir Richard Towneley, died Sep 1482.

 

Generation No. 9

9. Sir Richard Towneley died Sep 1482.

Sir Richard Towneley, who was knighted by Lord Stanley, at Hutton Field, in Scotland, in 1481, he m. Jane, daughter of Richard Southworth, esq. of Samlesbury.


Child of Sir Towneley and Joanna Southworth is:

i.    Sir John Towneley, born Abt. 1473 in Lancashire Co. England; died 1541.

 

Generation No. 10

10. Sir John Towneley was born Abt. 1473 in Lancashire Co. England, and died 1541. He married (1) Isabella Pilkington. She was born 1473 in Nottingham, England. He married (2) Ann Caterall.

Fought in an English army that invaded Scotland and was knighte d. He founded a chantry in St. Peters, the parish church of Burnley and bu ilt the chapel at Towneley in the North wing. He was a Catholic.

Sir John Towneley (1473-1539) founded a chantry in St. Peter's, the par ish church of Burnley and built the chapel at Towneley which is now incorp orated into the North wing.

Sir John's coat of arms (at one time on the outside wall of the chape l) is above the fireplace in the servant's hall at Towneley. The symbol of the three goats is the arms of Gateford, Nottinghamshire. This is the property that Sir John Towneley acquired after his marriage to Isabella, daughter and heiress of Sir Charles Pilkington of Gateford.

Towneley Hall was the home of the Towneley family from the 14th century until 1902. Charles (1737 - 1805) was one of the 18th century’s best known collectors of antique sculpture and gems and his famous portrait by lohan Zoffany takes pride of place in the art gallery, today's visitors to Towneley Hall can still catch a glimpse of how the family lived. Original period rooms include the Elizabethan long gallery and the Regency rooms, see how they compare with life below stairs in the Victorian kitchen and the servants’ dining room.

It is rumoured that the Hall is haunted by a spirit whose visits were limited to once every seven years, when its thirst for vengeance had to be satisfied by the untimely death of one of the Hall residents. Legend says that Sir John Towneley (1473 -1541) was said to have offended and injured the poor of the district by enclosing some of the areas Common Lands, making it part of his estate. As a punishment, his soul is said to wander about the Hall, crying out: "Be warned ! Lay out ! Be warned! Lay out! Around Hore-Law and Hollin-Hey Clough, To her children give back the widows cot For you and yours there’s still enough." This Boggart is the famed Towneley.

The lands were granted by the Honor of Clitheroe, Roger De Lacy, to Geoffrey, his son-in-law, in the year 1200. Over the centuries many alterations have been made to the Hall, so many that the Hall is now totally different to its original layout. The first major alterations in 1628 involved the use of 541/2 tons of lead for the roof, purchased from the local Thievely lead mine, and the last were in the early 20th Century, when the Art Galleries were added. At one time the main entrance was moved. To the left of the ‘new’ main door can be seen a smaller, filled in doorway, the original entrance.

Towneley Hall has been a museum since 1903 but before then it was the home of the Towneley family who lived on the estate from the mid-thirteenth century. The Regency Room wing contains traces of their first house on this site. The lower floor has six foot thick mediaeval walls and one Gothic window dating from around 1460.

By 1500 the Hall formed a square around a central courtyard and the park w as probably a formal garden with geometric avenues of trees and gravel wal ks. The fourth wing, containing a chapel, library and gatehouse, was demolished in 1700 and in the late eighteenth century the park was changed to a fashionable informal landscape garden with winding walks and trees planted in natural looking groups. The Hall's appearance today is largely the work of Jeffry Wyatt who added the porch and the decorative battlements and towers in the early nineteenth century.

For three hundred years the Towneleys were in favour with the Royal family and three of them received knighthoods, but during Elizabeth I's reign their lives changed. Protestantism became the official religion but the Towneleys were Catholic and refused to give up their faith. As a result, John Towneley (1528-1607) was fined and imprisoned for almost 25 years. Even after his release he was forced to stay within five miles of Towneley Hall.

Other members of the family fought for Catholic causes. During the Civil War Charles Towneley fought on the Royalist side and died at the Battle of Marston Moor. In the eighteenth century Sir John Towneley, Chevalier de St. Louis, was a supporter of Prince Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie). His brother Francis, appointed Governor of Carlisle by the Prince during the Jacobite rebellion of 1745, was executed when the rebellion failed.

Several Towneleys made their names in science and the arts. Richard Towneley (1629-1707) was the first person to measure rainfall in England for a length of time, but the best known member of the family was Charles (1737-1 805), a connoisseur whose collection of antique sculpture and gems was thought to be the best in the country.

In 1877 the last male heir in the family died and the Towneley estate w as split between six heiresses. The Hall became the property of Lady O'Hag an. Realising that she could not afford to maintain the building if she kept up her charity work, she sold the Hall in 1902 to Burnley Corporation to be used as a museum and art gallery. The building was handed over almost empty and the first exhibitions the following year were of borrowed items.

The family's motto - Hold to the Truth - is now the motto of Burnley Borogh Council.

     

Children of Sir Towneley and Isabella Pilkington are:

i.    Helen Towneley.

ii.   Grace Towneley.

iii.  Elizabeth Towneley.

iv.  Margaret Towneley.

v.   Sir Richard Towneley, born 1489; died 1555. He married Grace Foljambe.

vi.  Charles Towneley, born 1490 in Grays Inn, Burnley, Lancashire, England; died 1539.

vii. Jane Towneley, born Abt. 1515 in Of Lancashire, England; died Abt. 1558.

 

Generation No. 11

11. Jane Towneley was born Abt. 1515 in Of Lancashire, England, and died Abt. 1558. She married (1) William Dalton, son of Sir Dalton and Anne Radcliff. He was born 1513 in Byspham Manor, Lancashire England, and died 1543 in Byspham, Lancashire, England. She married (2) Thomas Shireburne. She married (3) Ralph Shuttleworth.

William was born 1513 in Byspham Manor, Lancashire England, and died 1543 in Byspham, Lancashire, England. He married (1) Margaret Torbock, daughter of Sir Torbock and Katherine Gerard. He married (2) Jane Towneley, daughter of Sir Towneley and Isabella Pilkington. She was born Abt. 1515 in Of Lancashire, England, and died Abt. 1558.

 

With William we reach the second of those much larger families which distinguish the Daltons of the Tudor period. His first wife was Margaret, daughter of Sir William Torbrock of Torbrock Hall. Gregson gives Dalton of Bispham among the Torbrock alliances, but in spite of the seven children born to them, none left descendants. William married secondly, Jane, daughter of Sir John Towneley. Some documents claim Jane was illegitimate. In the Chetham Society's publication dealing with the Visitation of Lancashire in 1533, the Towneley pedigree shows Sir John Towneley had married one daughter into the Hesketh family; another to a Shirburne, and a third to a Banastre.

In 1533 William Dalton "demised to Thomas Hough an acre of the hill and half an acre in the town meadow in Croston.

When William Dalton died in 1543, there devolved on his eldest son, Robert, the care of his widowed mother (Jane) and the younger members of the family. Trouble and change were the lot that lay before them, due both directly and indirectly to fidelity to the Roman Catholic faith in which they had been bred, and which brought ever more and more severe penalties on its adherents. The Reformation begun under Henry VIll had involved, with the suppression of the Monasteries in 1536 and 1539, not only religious difficulties, but immense changes in land ownership, since thousands of acres and a vast amount of real property were thrown back into the hands of the Crown, and by it sold or leased to new owners.

The Will of William Dalton, son of Roger Dalton of Croston: by R.N.D. Hamilton of the DGS.

William Dalton the elder son of Roger Dalton by his first marriage is described in the pedigree as "of Bispham", though he must have continued to ho ld the Croston property, under some settlement of it. In the pedigree his second wife Jane is described as the "bass' daughter of Sir John Towneley, the Towneleys being another important Lancashire family. However, in the addenda and corrigenda in the volume of the Harleian Society in which the pedigree appears, there is a note that Jane Towneley is not called a bass daughter in the Visitation of Lancaster in 1613, p 32, where the issue of her son Thomas is given. It will also be seen that in the pedigree

llen, William's aunt is described as Lady Garter. It is noted in the addenda and corrigenda that she was the wife, first of Rigbys and secondly, of Sir Christopher Barker, Garter, King-at-Arms.

There is a copy of William's will in the Towneley manuscripts held in the Manuscripts Department of the British Library, where I have inspected it. It is in a bound volume and is numbered 1474 in that volume. There is a note at the front of the volume, Evidences of Lancashire Gentry, and the manuscripts were purchased at a sale at Sotheby's in 1883. I noticed that besides the will there were other documents containing the name Dalton, but I did not have time to note them, particularly as sow at least were in Latin, though William's will itself was in English.


The will reads:
"In the name of god Amen. I William Dalton of Bispham in ye County of Lanc s. Esq. 28th November in the year of Henry VIII ye 35th and in the year of our lord 1543 my testament and last will duly made in manner and form following first I ordayne Jane my wife my Executrix. Also I give unto Richard my youngest some all my portion of goods which remain over and above my debts and funeral expenses. Also I will yt that my said wife by t he decease of Richard Radcliffe myne Uncle shall have all the goods which I ought to have. Also I will yt that my said wife shall bestowe such sums of money as she shall receive for the marriage of my son and heir up on the marriage of my four daughters, Jane, Margery, Anne and Margaret. And also I ordayne Sir Henry Ffaryngton, Knight and Raufe Bradshaws, Esq. to be supervisors of this my said will and to the same I have sett my seale and subscribed my name the day and year first above written. These being witnesses, Alexander Hoghton, Sir Robert (?) John Waddington, Thomas

Bowker, Ann (?) and Thomas Rydinge"

As indicated, there were two names, which I was unable to decipher.

There is no mention in the will of the manor of Bispham or any other lands. 'These would probably have descended under the terms of some settlement or the law of inheritance of land. William's mother was the daughter of Sir John Ratclyffe and it looks as though his uncle Richard Radcliffe had died, but the distribution of goods under his will had not yet been carried out at William's death. It would look from the pedigree as though his daughters Jane and Margery were daughters of the first marriage and Anne the daughter of the second marriage, while Margaret is not specifically shown but may have been one of the "3 others" of the first marriage, particularly as the first wife's name was Margaret. However, there is s mall pedigree in the margin to the manuscript containing the copy will showing them all as daughters of the second marriage. There is no mention in the will of any sons of the first marriage (possibly because they had died) and no mention in the will of the first and second sons of the second marriage, possibly because they were considered adequately provided for by the settlements of land as Robert the eldest, who established the Thurnham estate and sold Bispham and Croston, almost certainly was. Sir Henry Ffaryngton is appointed supervisor as he was in William's father's will. It is particularly interesting to see that Alexander Hoghton is a witness to the will for the Hoghton's were another important Lancashire family, living at Hoghton Tower five miles east of Preston.

 

Children of Jane Towneley and William Dalton are:

i.    Robert Dalton of Thurnham Hall, born Abt. 1529 in Of Bispham and Pilling, Lancashire England; died 1578 in Thurnham Hall, Lancashire England. He married Ann Kechyn 29 Aug 1554 in Thurnham Hall, Lancashire; died 1593.

ii.   Roger Dalton, born Abt. 1531 in Byspham, Lancashire, England; died 02 Feb 1593 in Holbon, London, England. He married (2) Mary Ward Abt. 1550; born Abt. 1534 in Pillings, Lancashire, England; died in .

iii.  Sir Thomas Dalton, born Abt. 1533 in Thurnham Hall, Lancashire, England; died in_____ . He married Ann Molyneux 1565 in Thurnham Hall, Lancashire Co. England; born Abt. 1539 in Of Sefton, Lancashire, England; died 29 Nov 1591.

iv.  Anne Dalton, born Abt. 1534; died in____. She married Thomas Westmer.

v.   Richard Dalton, born Abt. 1535; died in ____.

vi.  Marjery Dalton, born Abt. 1537 in Lancashire, England. She married Gylbert Moreton.

 

Chapter 16  Chapter 17  Chapter 18  Chapter 19  Chapter 20   Back to The Dalton Chronicles